Like Never Before: Forgiveness

As we continue our series through the Gospel of Mark and discover how Jesus did things like never before, we get to experience his encounters with real people who were seen and touched and loved by him while he was here in the flesh. These are beautiful encounters that are packed with more nuance than we will ever be able to grasp. Our encounter in Mark 2:1-12 is one of these.

Last week, we looked at Jesus’ compassion in his encounter with the leper. We saw how in that encounter, Jesus actually exchanged places with the leper. The leper went away healed. Jesus, because he had touched the leper, stayed in solitary and lonely places.

This week’s encounter finds Jesus heading back home to Capernaum.  He no longer goes to the synagogue to teach like he had done before. Instead, he goes to a house, and as was the case when he was in solitary and lonely places-the people came to him, so the house was full and the space outside the house was full. As Jesus was sharing his message with those gathered in the house, four friends of a paralyzed man tried to get their friend to Jesus. They realized that they were not going to be able to carry him through the crowd, so they came up with a plan. They climbed the stairs to the roof, dismantled the roof, and lowered their friend to the feet of Jesus.

There are so many things that I love about this moment. One, the faith and determination that the friends demonstrated; Jesus was in town and they were not going to miss this opportunity. Two, they dismantled the roof of the house and made a hole large enough to lower their friend and his mat through the roof. Picture in your mind the crowded house, Jesus teaching, and all of a sudden debris begins to fall on them as the hole in the roof appears. I wonder if Jesus laughed. I imagine that he was delighted with this demonstration of friendship and of faith. I imagine the homeowner wasn’t quite as thrilled.

And then, the like never before happens…

But before we get to that part of the story, let’s look at three biblical mindsets.

Romans 12:2 addresses a fixed mindset–it’s our default mindset. Scripture challenges us  to get rid of that mindset and replace it with a new one. I like the way that J.B. Phillips words it, he says, Don’t let the world around you squeeze you into its own mould, but let God re-mould your minds from within…, the NIV says Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind…the NLT states it this way, Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think.  

We are getting ready to encounter some fixed mindsets in our story, and fixed mindsets have a tendency to be reactive. We can probably all think of someone, or maybe even ourselves, who have reactive tendencies. Is it because our mindsets are fixed?

The second mindset is one that “leans toward” that bends toward a certain direction. Philippians 2:5 demonstrates this one when it says,  In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus (NIV). Pastor John put it this way, he said let the leanings of your mind lean in the same direction as the mind of Jesus. As long as we know Jesus well enough to see how he treated people, we can know that his mind is not self-serving, that it always leans in the direction of love.

The third mindset is highlighted in 1 Corinthians 14:20 which states do not be children in your thinking… in your thinking be mature. (ESV)  In this verse, the word for thinking comes from the word “diaphragm” which is the membrane in the body that helps us breathe. Breathing is natural to us, we don’t focus on it a great deal. Thinking is natural to us, we don’t focus on it a great deal, yet our mindset–which can be as natural to us as breathing, needs to be transformed so that our mindset becomes like that of Jesus–he wants his mindset in us to be as natural as breathing.

Back to Mark 2.  The friends of the paralyzed man lower him down and he lands in front of Jesus. It would have been impossible for the people in the house to ignore this moment. Do you wonder how they were responding? Were they talking about it, or has this moment rendered them silent? Were they laughing or were they mad? We know that there are “teachers of the law” in close proximity. (How did they get the front seats in this crowded house?)

Before the paralyzed man has said a word, Jesus said to him, “Your sins are forgiven.” Hmmm. What must the paralytic have been thinking in that moment? Is that why his friends went to such great lengths to get him to Jesus?  What is going on here?

Jesus knows our greatest need, and Jesus often times acts in unpredictable ways. In just a moment we are going to get to the part of the story where we know that Jesus knew the thoughts of the teachers of the law. Did he know the thoughts of the paralytic man? Was the man thinking to himself, “I’m not worthy to be in the presence of Jesus?” “I’m not worthy to be the center of attention?”  “I shouldn’t be here?”  We don’t know. But what if that was the case, and Jesus was addressing that mindset by letting the man know that nothing in his life was being held against him, that he could let go of guilt and shame, and that Jesus deemed him forgiven and worthy to be exactly where he was in that moment. If, as was the religious custom of the day, the man was being blamed for being a paralytic because of his sins, Jesus was taking care of that mindset as well.

However, the fixed mindset of the teachers of the law couldn’t see the beauty of the moment. Some of them were thinking to themselves  “Why does this fellow talk like that? He’s blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?”

So Jesus in his brilliance, but I also think in his love for the teachers of the law, addresses them in their own language.

They thought, “Why does this fellow talk like that?”  Jesus responds “Why are you thinking like that?”  Question for question.

They thought “He’s blaspheming!” (For a charge of blasphemy to be brought against someone, the blasphemous words had to be spoken.) Jesus responded, Which is easier: to say to this paralyzed man, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up, take your mat and walk’?

They thought, “Who can forgive sins but God alone?” Jesus responded, want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins. So he said to the man,  “I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home.”

There is so much packed in these verses. When Jesus spoke forgiveness to the paralytic man, he was breathing out what is natural for him. His nature is love, His nature is forgiveness. His ministry is reconciliation. The man did not ask for forgiveness, he didn’t have to jump through a number of religious hoops to receive forgiveness–Jesus just spoke it over him–because Jesus has authority on earth to forgive sins. All of them. And He has offered this gift to all of us. No one is excluded. And then he demonstrated his authority over the things of earth by physically healing the man. The man became the living parable that the authority of Jesus to forgive us changes our lives.

Jesus has the unique ability to be fully present with the people he encounters. He was fully present with the paralytic man–but he was also fully present with the teachers of the law. He was for all of them. He met the paralytic man where he was. He also met the teachers of the law where they were. He used questions, reasoning, and logic–their language– to address their thoughts.

Before the man was lowered, Jesus had been sharing his message with those gathered in the house. Earlier in the book of Mark, we learn that the message of Jesus was “Repent”–which literally means ” change your mind…get a new mind”, “because the kingdom of heaven is here.”  So to the group in the house, including the religious authorities of the day–the men who interpreted the religious law for the common people–Jesus is saying there is a new way to think about God. He is full of love, He is ready to forgive, He is here, and He is changing things.

The new covenant that Jesus introduced fulfilled all the requirements of the law in Him. Jesus forgave the paralytic man before he ever went to the cross–he has the authority to forgive- period–and he does not withhold his forgiveness from anyone. He demonstrated his authority to the teachers of the law, to the crowd in the house, to the friends of the paralytic man who were watching from the roof, to the man who was forgiven and healed, and to you. You can know, beyond a shadow of any doubt,  that God is for you. You can be free from legalism and rules. You can be free from the fixed mindset of this world, including the fixed mindset of religious systems. Every single moment in your life that has not measured up to the perfection of God is forgiven, so that, you can have an organic, real, personal relationship with a God who loves you more than you will ever comprehend. You don’t have to do anything to earn it.  Will you allow your mind to think the way Jesus thinks? Will you allow the Spirit to so totally change your mind, mold your mind, transform your mind,  that Christ’s way of thinking becomes as natural to you as breathing? Will you embrace God’s for-give-ness that He demonstrated in His give-for you?  And will you join him in giving for others?

The beautiful result of the rest of our encounter with the paralytic man was, He got up, took his mat and walked out in full view of them all. This amazed everyone and they praised God, saying, “We have never seen anything like this before!”

May we be such pure reflections of the heart, the mind, the sensitivity, feelings, intellect and actions of Jesus that the world sees the beauty of God through us and draws close to Him in praise, because they’ve never encountered anything like Him before…

–Luanne

Last week when we looked at the story of Jesus healing the leper, we remarked that as Jesus touched him, the kingdom came and invaded the life of the leper. In that story, it was a touch from Jesus that caused a collision of the heavens and earth. This week, it was Jesus’ words that carried the weight of the kingdom. His words, unprovoked, gushed out into the paralytic’s reality–and changed his life forever. Luanne wrote:

“The man did not ask for forgiveness, he didn’t have to jump through a number of religious hoops to receive forgiveness–Jesus just spoke it over him…”

Pastor John told us on Sunday that Jesus’ forgiveness of the paralyzed man says nothing about the heart of the man (we have no idea where his heart was) but that it says everything about the heart of Jesus. Luanne wrote about the heart of Jesus being for everyone who was present. His awareness and his focus were on the paralytic AND on everyone else in the room… the owners of the home, the friends on the roof, the teachers of the law in the front row, the others among them who needed healing. He was aware of all of them, and He chose his words accordingly.

I wonder what he was teaching about, what stories he might have been telling, before the roof began to open above them… Surely Jesus knew the thoughts of those around him before the paralytic entered the room. Perhaps his words to the man carried even more impact than we can know based on the record of the story that we have in our Bibles. We know that his thoughts are higher than ours, as are His ways, which, like Luanne said above, are often unpredictable. Regardless of what he’d been talking about, he chose to respond to this interruption by breathing out forgiveness. Forgiveness that was not asked for, earned, merited in any way, or sacrificed for… He washed away this man’s shortcomings not with blood, but with his breath. The same mouth that spoke creation spoke forgiveness. And he had (as he has now) full authority to do so. This is a big deal, and worthy of further study, but I’ll leave you to ponder and pursue that further on your own, if you so desire.

This kingdom collision moment stirred up the crowd. Jesus’ declaration of forgiveness set the minds of the teachers of the law (and probably the minds of everyone else, too) ablaze with questions. What we see in this story from these religious men is the picture of where their minds were fixed.

Luanne wrote about the three different definitions of “mind” that Pastor John spoke to us about on Sunday. The first one referenced is the fixed mindset, the one that is our default. This one is a fortified structure–it’s solid and largely unmoving, as the word “fixed” would infer. Both John and Luanne explained that this is the mindset that needs to be changed, renewed, transformed.

As I thought about this fixed, rigid, frame of mind, I found myself thinking about Ezekiel 36:26:

 I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.

When I looked into this verse a little more deeply, I found that the Hebrew word that is translated “heart” in this verse is the word “leb.” This little word is used over 500 times in the Hebrew scriptures. It is translated “heart” in most cases, but it is translated “mind” or “understanding” a combined 22 times. The definition of the word is interesting… It means “inner person: mind, will, heart, understanding, soul, thinking, knowledge, inclination, determination of will”, and is also used widely to mean “the center” of anything. The Greek English Lexicon of the NT based on Semantic Domains states that the “Hebrew term ‘leb’, though literally meaning ‘heart’, refers primarily to the mind.”

I don’t know about you, but I find this pretty captivating… especially if we replace the word heart in Ezekiel 36:26 with our understanding of what the original word referenced, the idea of the mind.

It gets better. The Hebrew word “leb” has a Greek equivalent that we see all over the New Testament. This word is “kardia”. It is one of many words that is translated “heart” in the NT, and it shows up twice in this week’s passage–both in reference to the teachers of the law:

But some of the scribes were sitting there and reasoning in their hearts (kardia)…    (Mark 2:6)

Immediately Jesus, aware in His spirit that they were reasoning that way within themselves, said to them, “Why are you reasoning about these things in your            hearts (kardia)?” (Mark 2:8)

I am using the NASB because it is a more direct translation, but it is very interesting if you read through different translations of these verses how interchangeably the words “heart” and “thinking” are used.

Though we know Jesus was able to speak Greek (evidenced by His exchanges with the woman with the demon-possessed child in Matthew 14, as well as His conversations with Pontius Pilate), it is generally agreed upon by historians and theologians that he most likely spoke Aramaic, a sister language to Hebrew. More than likely, given his audience in this week’s passage, he was speaking Aramaic. So we don’t know exactly what words he used. What we know is that whatever words he used, the Greek word that translators chose in these two passages for “heart” is the one that is the equivalent to the Hebrew “leb”. I apologize if I’m being too much of a word-nerd here, but I find this fascinating…

These teachers of the law were working from a fixed, rigid framework–let’s say, a mindset that was set in stone. We know that it is this frame of mind that needs to be changed to become like the mind of Jesus. And when Jesus addresses these men, he uses a word that they would have recognized as interchangeable with the word from the scripture in Ezekiel. Could it be that he was offering to remove their hearts/minds/centers of being that were set in stone and replace them with hearts/minds/centers of being that were instead made of flesh? Able to bend, move, lean toward him rather than away? Is this part of how Jesus was loving these teachers of the law in his midst whilst loving the paralytic into the freedom of forgiveness? I don’t know the answer, but I do know that, like Luanne expressed above, Jesus is always FOR everyone. All of us. Period. So I don’t find it a stretch to imagine that in this moment, Jesus himself was offering to replace their fixed mindsets, inviting them to adopt his way of thinking in place of  their own rigid ones.

This is such an important thing for all of us to understand, to grasp, to see in ourselves. Luanne wrote, “…our mindset–which can be as natural to us as breathing, needs to be transformed so that our mindset becomes like that of Jesus–he wants his mindset in us to be as natural as breathing.” If we are to be vessels that carry the kingdom of Jesus to the world around us, we have to be disciples of Jesus, learning from him constantly, being made more like him every step of the way. This is what the renewing of our minds, and being transformed is all about. Dallas Willard, in his book The Divine Conspiracy, says it this way:

“And as a disciple of Jesus I am with him, by choice and by grace, learning from him how to live in the kingdom of God. This is the crucial idea. That means, we recall, how to live within the range of God’s effective will, his life flowing through mine. Another important way of putting this is to say that I am learning from Jesus to live my life as he would live my life if he were I. I am not necessarily learning to do everything he did, but I am learning how to do everything I do in the manner that he did all that he did… I am learning from Jesus how to lead my life, my whole life, my real life.” 

I am learning from Jesus to live my life as he would live my life if he were I… 

Since I read that passage a couple of weeks ago, that one line won’t leave my consciousness. How would Jesus live my life–in every moment–if he were me? It changes my responses. It refocuses my mind and priorities. It helps me let go and forgive when I don’t want to. It makes me take notice of others who do this well, those around me that I can learn from.

And it reminds me to simply pay attention. How did Jesus live? What did he do and say? How did he love? In this week’s story, we read of how forgiveness is as natural as breathing to Jesus. And we know that we are to be transformed more and more into his likeness. But forgiveness doesn’t always come so easily to us… How are we to get there?

We have to breathe in what Jesus breathes out so that it can then live within us and grow within our hearts and minds. It’s like CPR for our souls. When we inhale the life-giving love and forgiveness of Jesus, we inhale the kingdom. As the kingdom lives and breathes within us, we become more like Jesus, so that we can grow into people to whom forgiveness is as natural as breathing. And then we can exhale this life, love, forgiveness–the ways of the kingdom–to those around us.

As we move forward, I pray that we learn to ask ourselves how Jesus would live our lives if he were us. And I hope that we’ll learn to let our minds lean toward him, to bend toward his way of thinking. Let’s ask him to replace our hearts/minds/centers of being that are fixed and stony with hearts and minds of flesh that are able to love and forgive the way he does. Let’s ask him. His response to us is as natural as breathing for him. We can trust him to exhale love and forgiveness–the kingdom life–into our lives just like he did for those he encountered in our story this week. And as we breathe him in, we’ll grow into people who can love and forgive like never before.

–Laura

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Like Never Before #3: Authority

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr

Who is the authority over your life?

To answer this question, we have to first identify what “authority” is. Merriam-Webster’s first definition of the word is: power to influence or command thought, opinion, or behavior. We also understand it to generally mean the permission or ability to do something. Pastor John reminded us on Sunday that authority is typically inherited (as in a royal family), earned by experience (education, time on the job), or delegated/bestowed (political office).

Our passage this week was Mark 1:21-34. In verse 22, we read, regarding Jesus’ teaching in the temple:

 The people were amazed at his teaching, for he taught with real authority—quite unlike the teachers of religious law. (NLT)

Jesus came with a different kind of authority. His authority is inherent. This word means: existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. Jesus has authority simply because of who He is...

The people who heard Him teach recognized the other-worldly authority that immediately set Him apart–and it left them wide-eyed in amazement.

As Pastor John walked us through this passage, He identified three distinct facets of Jesus’ authority. He has intellectual authority, spiritual authority, and physical authority. His intellectual authority is what first amazed the people in His presence. We don’t know exactly what He said, and the actual words are not what matters in this case. The point was not what was said, but, rather, Who said it. It is this authority that calls us to repent–to change our minds and align our thinking with His.

Next, Jesus demonstrated spiritual authority, as He silenced and called out the evil that was present among them. It was no contest for Him–the evil recognized Jesus and His authority and, while it had no desire to leave, it had no choice. Jesus spoke briefly and pointedly–and it was done.

After Jesus finished teaching in the synagogue, they went to Simon’s (Peter’s) house, where his mother-in-law was sick with a fever. They told Jesus about her, and verse 31 tells us that …he went to her, took her hand and helped her up… The fever left her immediately, and she began to wait on them. Later that evening, the people in the town brought to Jesus everyone who was in need of healing, and we’re told that Jesus healed many of them. These healings demonstrated the physical authority of Jesus.

It is the physical authority of Jesus that we typically long for the most. We want Him to heal diseases, reconnect estranged family members, bring us breakthroughs financially, provide for our day-to-day, physical needs. We pray that He will fix what is broken around us–the things that we can see and touch. We know that He can–we’ve read the stories of miracles, and so we believe that He is able–so we ask Him to show up in these very tangible, physical ways in our lives.

And we largely ignore the other facets of His authority…

But, “…my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord“As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts…” (Isaiah 55:8-9) 

Jesus’ order of things is almost always different than ours, because His desired outcome is not simply that our physical needs are met, and that we live happy and prosperous lives. He does meet our needs. He does heal. And there’s certainly nothing wrong with being happy or successful in theory… But the Kingdom that Jesus brought with Him into time and space is not primarily focused on these things. So, when our focus is set on the physical, we can find ourselves disappointed when Jesus doesn’t seem to meet our expectations.

I opened with this quote from Father Richard Rohr:

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”

Jesus came to change our minds about God–to show us the perfect image of our previously invisible God, and to replace the lies we believed about who He is and the orientation of His heart toward humanity with the truth of who He really is. He came to show us how far Love would go for us… And He keeps coming to us. To rewrite the stories in our heads that have become “truth” to us. This is so important because, as Pastor John told us on Sunday, the beliefs we hold onto affect every part of us. What we believe in our minds–the stories that cycle through our thoughts–impacts us spiritually and physically. I don’t know about you, but I know this is true for me. A fearful thought, or a belief that I’ve been rejected by someone can wreak havoc in my mind. My focus is immediately on the fear or the rejection, and it pulls me away from the truth of who God is, and the truth of who He says I am. I become spiritually disconnected, and it begins to have physical effects. As my thoughts spiral, I feel the hurt and anger in my chest… My heart rate might speed up, I may cry, my outward reactions to the people around me can become strained and impatient. However it manifests, it absolutely affects me physically. And it all starts in my mind…

Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard wrote, “Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts.” I have to agree with his assertion, and I believe it’s why Paul implores us in Colossians 3:2 to, “Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

Our minds have incredible power to affect our lives, so this is where Jesus begins. He wants to change how we think, to teach us and empower us to follow Him. He desires that we focus on who He is--that we see Him rightly (which will always leave us amazed…) so that we can be free from the lies that dominate our thoughts–rather than on what He can do. But, as is always the case with our Jesus, He will not impose His authority on an unwilling mind. He himself states in Matthew 28:18, “…All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” ALL authority. But He doesn’t control us with His authority. We all have to settle within ourselves who the authority in our lives is. To whom do we give the authority to teach us, speak into us, lead us, heal us? For some of us, fear is our authority. For others of us, we look to our nation or government as our ultimate authority. Maybe it’s a spouse, a leader, or maybe it’s just ourselves. But, be assured, all of us have set someone or something as the authority over our lives. It’s our job to identify who or what that is. 

Once we invite the authority of Jesus to transform our minds and change the way we think about Him, we are able to see His power manifest in the spiritual as well. So many of us have wrongly identified evil as the strongest force in our world and, in doing so, we’ve allowed fear to become our authority. Our fears become what we answer to–they get to dictate our moments and our days. When our beliefs have told us over and over again how strong the evil is and how much we have to fear, we lose sight of the truth that evil trembles in the Presence of our Jesus. We unknowingly begin to cooperate with evil more than we yield to the authority of our King. Once we allow Jesus to speak truth to our minds, so that we can begin to change the way we think, He can turn our beliefs about evil right-side up and silence our fears–He can and will call out the evil that has been making a home in our lives, and bring spiritual healing that we didn’t know to ask for.

Once our minds and our spirits are touched by the authority and power of Jesus, some of our physical “needs” will fall by the wayside. As our focus changes, the things we ask for begin to change, too. But still, very real physical needs remain. Sickness, poverty, broken relationships–these are realities in our world, and even when our eyes are focused on the face of Jesus, we long for His healing to flow to these places.

In our passage, we see Jesus’ physical authority in the way He deals with Simon’s mother-in-law and her fever. Mark 1:31 tells us that “…he went to her, took her hand and helped her up.” The sweetness of Jesus that is evidenced in these few words fills my heart, and my eyes… This One who fashioned galaxies, who with a single breath created life; this One in whom all authority in the heavens and on earth resides is so very personal and tender and with us–present in all of our moments. And this is simply His way… The way He came to Simon’s mother-in-law is the way He comes to you, and to me. Before anything else happens, there is the wonder of His coming… He is always coming to us. Always. We sang “Reckless Love” on Sunday. These are some of the words we sang…

“There’s no shadow You won’t light up, Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down, Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
I couldn’t earn it, and I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away…”

Jesus’ physical authority is not established because He always answers our prayers for healing the way that we want Him to–there are many instances I can recall from my own life where this hasn’t been the case. No, he does so much more than wave His hand and fix what’s wrong, what’s broken, what’s dying… He establishes His physical authority by way of His Presence. God with us comes to us, holds us, helps us, and brings us hope.

Sometimes the healing doesn’t come–but Jesus always does.

And He knows the answers to all of our “why?” questions. He knows the kind of healing we need most. He knows what those we love need most. We know He can do anything, and that He actually possesses the authority to do whatever we ask, so when He doesn’t heal or provide or restore the way we ask Him to, we wonder why. But if we have allowed His authority to reshape our minds, to repair our spirits and to reset our beliefs, we can say “It is well with my soul…” because we know Him. We will be able to see Him rightly and so we’ll know that He is always good, and always coming after us, to hold us and to help us His way. Pastor and author Brian Zahnd writes in his book, Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God, that he began to pray this prayer in the year 2000:

“God, I want to spend the rest of my life discovering you as you are revealed in Christ.”

That’s a prayer that invites the grandness of God to change our minds. It’s a prayer that invites the authority of Jesus to show us who our God really is–and that’s something we need more than we know…

And so, friends, I ask you even as I ask my own heart–

Is this Jesus the authority in your life? 

I pray we will all have the courage to dig deep, to listen, to let the higher thoughts and ways of Jesus change our minds where they need to be changed, so that we can see Him for who He truly is–the One who holds all authority in the heavens and on earth. He’s waiting for you and for me to invite Him in, so that He can do what only He can do.

–Laura

Laura asks us: Is this Jesus the authority in your life?  

If I answer that question honestly, my answer is most of the time I’m okay with that idea, but there are plenty of times that I want Jesus to yield to my way, even knowing that His ways are good and right–even if I don’t understand them. He is the source of His own authority, and whether I choose to live under His authority does not change the fact that He has it. If I introduce myself to someone, and tell them my name is Luanne, but they don’t believe that’s my name–it doesn’t change the fact that Luanne is my name. So it is with Jesus. He has authority over all things intellectual, spiritual, and physical. His authority has no bearing on my response to His authority. I’m the one who suffers if I choose my own way.

If you’ve read our blog for any length of time, you know that Laura and I both believe that all of scripture has to be interpreted through the lens of Jesus, We believe, from the bottom of our hearts, that what Paul says of Jesus in Colossians 1:15-18 is true:

 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.  For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy.
Read those verses through a few times. Read them slowly. Sit with them. Ponder the wonder, the mystery, the power, the authority that Jesus has. He is Lord. There is no other.
In highlighting his intellectual authority, I think of the Sermon on the Mount (Mt. 5-7). Jesus has told people that He did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. He says, a number of times, you have heard it said–but I say to you...  
Over and over in His sermon, He uses this phrase. He has the authority to challenge the Pharisaic interpretation of the law, and He did just that. He turned it on its head-the common people loved it, the Pharisees, not so much.
I  read something recently that caused me to stop, re-read, and I’m still thinking about it, because I believe it to be true, and I believe it may be the reason that Evangelical Christians have a reputation in this country of being mean. The thought went something like this: We can’t use the voice of Moses to silence the voice of Christ. (Zahnd).  I would say that the same is true of the Apostle Paul’s voice, or any other voice. Christ is Supreme.
I believe we’ve used scripture to silence His voice many times, which has led us to looking and being less and less like Him, rather than more and more like Him. He is Lord. What He says is the final authority on all matters. That is why we have got to know Him. We’ve got to know His ways. We have got to spend time reading the gospels over, and over, and over, and over. Then, we interpret the rest of the written word through the lens of Jesus, the Living Word.  If something seems contradictory in scripture, go with Jesus! He has every right to challenge our cultural understanding of Christianity. Will we be teachable?
When He says to us “You have heard it said…”, or “Your church tradition taught”…”but I say to you…”  will we question His authority?  To be Christian means we look like Christ, we love like Christ, we serve like Christ, etc. He has invited us to be part of His mission, and His mission is fueled by the heart of God whose very nature is love.
“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr
Jesus, the image of the invisible God, the demonstration of the love of God, the Prince of Peace, the Hope of the world is here, and He invites us to recognize and submit to His intellectual authority, His spiritual authority, and His physical authority over all things. He is kind. He is good. He does not use His authority to demean us, but to lift us up, to declare us righteous, to help us grow, to give us purpose and meaning, to teach us to live like Him and to love like Him, and to allow us to join Him in the mission of the only Kingdom worth serving.
–Luanne
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Advent #2: Love & Preparation

So if you’re serious about living this new resurrection life with Christ, act like it. Pursue the things over which Christ presides. Don’t shuffle along, eyes to the ground, absorbed with the things right in front of you. Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—that’s where the action is. See things from his perspective. Your old life is dead. Your new life, which is your real life—even though invisible to spectators—is with Christ in God. He is your life. When Christ (your real life, remember) shows up again on this earth, you’ll show up, too—the real you, the glorious you.

(Colossians 3:1-4a, The Message)

On the second Sunday of Advent, Pastor John lit the love candle. He invited us to consider how we are preparing for the coming of Christ, and whether or not it’s the love of Christ–or something else–that is magnified in our lives. During this season, as John pointed out, we do a lot of preparing. We spend time decorating, cooking, planning, wrapping–and we see Christmas morning as the culmination of all of our preparation. If you remember what we talked about last week, though, you know that we–as Jesus followers–aren’t only looking back at when he came in the past. We are looking with hope toward His coming again. That means our “preparation” need not be seasonal. It is, instead, a lifestyle.

Pastor John told us that he believes there is a verse that summarizes what Christmas needs to be about. It is Colossians 3:2, contained within the passage above. I opened with the Message paraphrase of the passage because it adds nuance that makes the whole passage more understandable. But you are probably more familiar with the NIV translation of verse 2. It reads,

Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

How does this verse fit with Christmas? The same way that it fits every day of the year. Which, if I’m not mistaken, was Pastor John’s point. We take time to celebrate and remember the first Advent of Christ at this time every year. But how we live, what we prioritize, where our focus is–these ought not change with the seasons. For Kingdom-minded Jesus followers, the “spirit of Christmas”–hope, love, joy, preparation, celebration, giving–is how we aim to live every day.

How do we live this way? We set our minds on things above, not on earthly things.

Does this mean we live with our heads in the clouds, dreaming of heaven and angels with harps? Uh, no. Thankfully, it doesn’t mean that at all. And not setting our minds on earthly things does not mean we stop decorating, gift-giving, white elephant partying, etc…

What it means is we have to find our focus. What, or who, is most important to you? What do you prioritize? What we focus on has our attention. Whatever has our attention becomes the object of our affection, our love.Whatever has our love is magnified in us. People know what we love because whatever we are focused on, we naturally magnify. So, to “set our minds” is to bring something into focus, to give our attention to something.

The verse tells us to set our minds on things above, not on earthly things. I love the way the Message expresses this part: Don’t shuffle along, eyes to the ground, absorbed with the things right in front of you. Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—that’s where the action is. See things from his perspective. “Things above” are the things of Christ. The things that matter to Him, to His kingdom. The earthly things aren’t all bad–many earthly things are good, and lovely. We’re just not supposed to set our minds on these things, give our affection to them, prioritize them. We are invited to look up from all the things of this world that can consume our hours and our days, and be alert to Christ. He is the One worthy of our affection, and His kingdom is the one we live from. 

I listen to a weekly podcast called “Things Above”. It is hosted by author James Bryan Smith. He describes his podcast this way:

“This is a podcast for ‘mind discipleship.’ It is for those who want to set their minds on ‘things above’ (Col. 3:2). Each week, I will offer a glorious thought–something good and beautiful and true, something excellent and praiseworthy–to fill your mind with heavenly truths.”

I love listening to this short podcast every week because it does exactly that. It offers glorious thoughts–thoughts that draw me deeper into Kingdom-mindedness, thoughts that deepen my understanding of the character of God and what that means for life here and now. Thoughts that I can set my mind on…

But what do we do once we find our focus and set our minds on things above? Is that it? Focus on Christ and watch Him for the rest of our lives?

Far from it… We can choose to live that way if we want to… But, according to novelist & journalist Chuck Palahniuk, living that way wouldn’t be living at all. He wrote,

“The easiest way to avoid living is to just watch.”

If we set our minds and our attention on Jesus and His ways, but don’t join Him where He is, we aren’t living. This line, from the Message translation of our Colossians passage, seems to be in agreement with Chuck:

Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—that’s where the action is.

John said on Sunday that “movement marks [God’s] whole story.” Every part of the story that includes Creation, life & death, our humanity, and God’s activity in it all moves. And perhaps no part of the story moves more than the pages where Jesus put skin on and came to us as one of us.

What if Zechariah & Elizabeth, Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, and the wise men had simply watched…? Simply seen and heard…?

Here’s the thing–

It is possible to focus on Jesus, give Him our attention, and watch what He’s doing… all without moving from the place where we are.

However, if He has all of our attention, and if that attention becomes affection that blossoms into love that outgrows our insides… it’s impossible to simply watch.

When preparing our hearts and making space for our King becomes our one overwhelming desire, when we are wholly focused and wholly devoted to the One leading us, when we can say “Jesus, be the center of it all” and mean it with all that we are, we. will. move. Because love moves. Love sees what Jesus is doing and is stirred to join Him–no matter the cost.

The individuals in our familiar Christmas stories had an awareness of God. But more than being aware of Him, they were devoted to Him. He was their priority. And so when He came to them, in whatever ways He chose, they accepted His invitation to join Him on the journey of a lifetime. A journey that would change not only their lives, but would change the entire world.

Maybe we need to ask ourselves where we are this Advent season… Are we sitting in the stands, spectators who live with our heads down, focused on the things of earth? What if God wants to move part of His story through you? Through me? I have no doubt that we are invited to partner with Him as He changes this world. I have no doubt that He desires for all of us to join Him in what He’s doing right now. He loves to bring things above to bear through things below… More specifically, through people below.

Will we join Him?

–Laura

Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

Sit with that verse for a minute. Let it have your attention–your focus. Ponder what it means.

Laura wrote above:

What we focus on has our attention. Whatever has our attention becomes the object of our affection, our love.Whatever has our love is magnified in us. People know what we love because whatever we are focused on, we naturally magnify. So, to “set our minds” is to bring something into focus, to give our attention to something.

I also want to reiterate Laura’s point that to “set our minds” on something does not imply that we just sit and watch. To set our minds on something leads to the trajectory of our lives. Our actions begin in our minds, our words begin in our minds, our choices begin in our minds, our relationships thrive or not depending on how we think and what we choose as a result of those thoughts.

Scripture is not silent on this issue:

In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus…(Ph 2:5).

For to set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. (Romans 8:6 ESV)

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.  (Romans 12:2)

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. (Philippians 4:8)

“‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind‘; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.” (Luke 10:27)

Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

So, this week’s advent theme is love, yet it would appear that we are talking about something totally different–except for the fact that what we love consumes our minds, and agape (unconditional love) is a Holy Spirit empowered choice of the heart and mind followed by action.

As I’ve pondered our key verse--set your minds (focus) on things above, I’ve wondered if “things above”– rather than referring to things far off, way up in some inaccessible place– could mean “things above” as in above our fallen world’s ways of doing things and our fallen world’s ways of thinking…setting our minds on the way God thinks–his mindset.

God has said to us:  As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts. (Isaiah 55:9).

 I believe that to set our minds on things above means to align ourselves with God’s ways. In order to align ourselves with His ways, we must know Him, and to know Him we must love Him, and if we love Him, we will walk with Him, and He, and His ways,  will consume our thoughts, and those thoughts will inform our choices, and our choices will lead us to live in Him, and His life in us will spill over to those around us, and He will be magnified. 

Paul, just a couple of verses after he wrote set your minds on things above… wrote the phrase, …Christ, who is your life...

Acts 17:28 tells us that in Him we live and move and have our being. That verse certainly implies that Jesus is our total life force– it also implies action– movement.

Pastor John, when talking to us about focusing on and magnifying something, explained to us the science behind magnification. In order for something to be magnified, light rays, which normally run parallel to one another, have to be bent, which happens when they pass through a curved lens. Those light rays then converge-are concentrated through the lens- and bring whatever is out of focus or hard to see into focus, making it possible to see detail that was previously unclear.

I love the fact that magnification has everything to do with the bending of light. Light is always on the move. The Apostle John tells us of Jesus that in him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. (John 1:4)

In the Old Testament, when Moses asked God to show him His glory, God replied “You cannot see my face, for no one may see me and live.”(Ex. 33:20).

But in the first advent, God bends His glorious, blinding, all consuming light rays in the person of Jesus— and concentrates all of His love and His desire for relationship with us through Jesus, so that who He truly is–the God whose very nature is love– can be made clear to us. He makes Himself knowable and approachable through Jesus–the Light of all mankind. When we look through Jesus we see who God is. If we have seen the Son then we have seen the Father. (Jn 14:9) 

The Christmas story includes beautiful accounts of magnification and light.

Mary, in her song of praise (after Gabriel fills her in on God’s plan), exclaims my soul magnifies the Lord… (Luke 1:46)She rejoices that she is part of God’s plan and is willing to make Him great, to bring Him into focus, to carry His light, to yield to His plan, to magnify Him.

In Luke 2 we are told that there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them... Brilliant light caught their attention and resulted in them being among the first to see God in the flesh, to worship Him in person, and to carry the message of that encounter to those around them. 

In Matthew 2 we learn that the wise men, when looking for Jesus, told King Herod,  “We have seen His star in the East and have come to worship Him.”  Light led these men to leave their own country and travel a great distance in order to draw close to God who had come to make Himself known in the person of Jesus.

There is acknowledgment, awe, and movement in each of these encounters.

Jesus, in John 8:12 tells the people “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” Whoever follows me… will have the light of life.  To follow implies movement.

In Matthew 5:14 Jesus tells us “You are the light of the world…”

To be the light of the world; to magnify the God who so loves the world that He gave His only Son; to bring God into focus, means choosing to bend before Him, to yield to His ways, so that His glorious light rays can shine through our lives, illuminating Him in a way that those around us can see Him and experience His love, His life, His light.

Beautiful lyrics that we sing every year speak of this glorious light:

Silent night, Holy night, Son of God, love’s pure light. Radiant beams from Thy holy face, with the dawn of redeeming grace.  Jesus, Lord at Thy birth. Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth. (Joseph Mohr)

Redeeming grace, grace which makes it possible for us to be restored, to be made new, to be in relationship with God, to receive His light, to be His light, to reflect His love…

In Him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind.

Set your mind…

 

–Luanne

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Dear Church #4 – Philippians 2:1-11

Last summer I attended a conference; one of the speakers there encouraged us to begin reading scripture with a new lens. (We all have a tendency to read scripture through our own cultural lens/bias and miss out on deeper revelation.)  She encouraged us to start in the gospels, to read slowly, to pay attention to who the people are in each passage, to consider their station in life–would they have been considered the privileged or oppressed? Are they “firsts” or “lasts”? How does Jesus respond to each group? How does He challenge societal norms? How does He flip the culture of the day on its head? Who does He esteem? Who does He correct?

It’s been one of the most powerful and life giving suggestions I’ve ever received at a conference. It has breathed new life into my relationship with God. I’m not reading scripture to get my nugget for the day; I’m reading to get to know Him and His ways, and He is speaking to me in deep places. Slowing way, way down, not being in a hurry to move through chapters and verses has allowed me to sit with Jesus, to learn from the Holy Spirit, and be awed by the love of God for all people in a new, fresh, and compelling way. So, in this post, we are going to slow down a familiar passage of scripture, chew on it, sit with it, and let it read us-rather than us reading it.

In Philippians 2 the Apostle Paul continues building on what he started in chapter one. He begins this portion of his letter with an “if”/”then” thought process:

Verse 1:

If you have any encouragement from being united with Christ

If you have any comfort from His love

If you have any common sharing in the Spirit

If any tenderness

If any compassion

Verses 2-4:

Then make my joy complete:

Then be like-minded,

Then have the same love

Then be one in spirit and mind

Then do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit

Then humbly value others above yourselves

Then don’t look to your own interests, but each of you to the interests of the others…

Let’s pause here and consider the “ifs”.

Are you united with Christ? Are you in a relationship with Him? Have you connected yourself to Him and His ways? Have you allowed Him to minister to you, to work in you, to change you?  Have you received encouragement from Him?

Encouragement is an interesting word. The word courage–means “heart”. “En” means “make, put in”. The definition includes words such as consolation, comfort, solace, that which affords comfort or refreshment, encouragement.

The definition of encourage is to make strong, hearten. (The opposite-discourage-weakens, deflates, disheartens).

Has Jesus strengthened you? Has He comforted you? Has He refreshed you? Has He come alongside you? Is He with you?  Does He encourage you?

Do you have comfort from His agape? Do you have absolute assurance of His love? Do you know that He will always love you? You don’t earn it, or deserve it, or lose it. He just loves you, totally and completely forever and always, and you can rest assured that His love is never going away. Perfect agape casts out fear (1 John 4:18), and God’s love is perfect. Does that comfort you?

Do you have common sharing, fellowship with others? Our English translation can’t get to the depth of what this means. The Greek word is koinonia and it is so much deeper than just hanging out together. It is a deep connection, a Spirit connection with others. It is being part of a spiritual community, of sharing everything, of joint participation, of shared mission and purpose, of unity.

Have you received tenderness from Jesus? Has his kindness, his love, his mercy ministered to you?  One of the phrases in the Strong’s definition is “a heart in which mercy resides”.  Has his merciful heart ministered to you?

Have you received compassion from Jesus? Another incredibly interesting word which implies mercy, but also  has this component in it: to feel sympathy with the misery of another–such sympathy as manifests itself in act, less frequently in word. Compassion means to suffer with…

IF you have experienced any of this from Jesus. THEN…  Scroll back up and read through the “thens”. Once you’ve done that, we’ll continue on and see what the “thens” looked like  in the person of Jesus.

Verses 5-8

(Then) Your attitude should be the same as that of Christ Jesus.  The word attitude, and the word like-minded in verse two are the same Greek word. So, your mind should be the same as that of Christ Jesus.  The “thens” start with the mind of Christ in us. There is much New Testament scripture about having a new mind in Christ…do not be conformed anymore to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind…(Rom 12:2); The mind of the flesh is death, but the mind of the spirit is life and peace. (Rom. 8:6)  Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength (Luke 10:27) and many others! The mind of Christ–what does that look like in this passage?

Before the incarnation, Jesus was in the form of God, but he did not grasp that form tightly. Instead, he laid aside that form and put on the form of our humanity, and not just of our humanity–he made himself the lowest. Again, our English translation cleans this up for us a bit, but the actual word “servant” is the word doulos – bond-servant. It means a person bound in service without wages. It could be voluntary or forced, but a bondservant was subservient to and entirely at the disposal of his master–essentially a slave.

Going back to my new scripture lens –this passage blows me away, and we’re not even through it yet. Jesus laid aside all of his privilege, everything He had in heaven, and made himself one of the least of these.  He could have come as a privileged man, but that was not the way it happened. He was born into an oppressed ethnic group during Roman rule.  His family was homeless when he was born,  he was poor during his childhood, he was a manual laborer before he began his ministry, and he was homeless again as an adult.  Luke 8 tells us that he was financially supported by women–extremely counter cultural.  Let all of that sink in for a minute.

So in this human form, Jesus humbled himself completely.  We don’t always understand the meaning of that word either. Humble means to make low, to level-reduce to a plain, a lower rank, devoid of all haughtiness.

And he became obedient to death—even death on a cross.   Did you know that obedient means giving ear? To obey means to listen attentively and follow through.  The implications of that are huge. If we are going to obey God, and think like Jesus, we must draw close to Him, be silent, and create space for Him to speak.

And the height of humiliation? Public death on a cross.

However, because Jesus lived from this humble, obedient, bond-servant mindset, this form…

God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father. (9-11)

This is where it all begins. Does your tongue, does my tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord? Do our knees (individually and collectively)  bow to Him in subservience and submission? If Jesus is Lord, the only response we can give Him is “yes”. Otherwise we exalt ourselves and our wills above His, and we become our own lords.

I find it interesting that in Strong’s Concordance the word confess (admit, agree fully) also means profess-to acknowledge openly and joyfully, to celebrate, give praise to. 

Pastor John pointed out in his sermon that we sometimes use verses 9-11 as a weapon from a place of arrogance–“One day, dude, you’re gonna be forced to admit that Jesus is Lord–you won’t have any choice and you’re going to be made to bow down. Then you’ll see that we Christians were right all along. Nanny-nanny-boo-boo!”

Somehow, I don’t think that’s what Paul is trying to say here. Paul has been telling us that he prays for our agape to abound more and more for other people. He has told us that to live is Christ–the mission, heart, passion of Jesus. And here he says–be like Him. Be like Christ in the way you think, in the way you live, in the way you relate with the world. I believe, dear Church, if we can get this figured out, that people will be hungry for a relationship with Jesus, they will confess and profess that He is Lord because coming into relationship with Him brings joy, purpose, freedom, celebration…

Dear Church, are we living the “thens”  for the glory of God? Are we living the “thens” and drawing people to Jesus? Or are we sending a hostile, haughty message to the world?

Jesus himself told his disciples when they were having a little dispute over greatness You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servantand whoever wants to be first must be your slave just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (Mt 20:25-28). 

He said that to His disciples then. He says that to His disciples (students, learners, apprentices) today.

Dear Church, when people see us, do they see Him? Are we bearing fruit that looks like Jesus? Are we lowering ourselves or exalting ourselves? Are we grasping-holding tightly-  to our privilege or laying it aside for the sake of the Kingdom of Heaven? Are we oppressing people or helping people? Are we listening attentively and bringing peace or running our mouths and creating chaos? Do we look like Jesus? Do we think like Jesus? Do we love like Jesus? Do we reflect Jesus? Do we know the real Jesus?

Dear Church–if He is Lord, we will look like Him, act like Him, love like Him, be humble like Him, align ourselves with the oppressed and marginalized- the sick, the lost, the foreigner, the poor, the despised, the powerless, those discriminated against, like He did, and not be afraid of the cost. He came for us, and in His name and His way, He sends us out so that the world He loves can know Him and confess Him as Lord.

–Luanne

I love that Luanne began with an invitation to slow down. It’s an exercise that is vital to going deeper, to gaining understanding, to getting to know the real Jesus and his heart for real people.

If you’ve been around church at all, you’ve probably heard this week’s passage, in part or in whole. Even if you’ve never stepped inside a church, you’ve likely heard some of it quoted-and perhaps not kindly, as Luanne eluded to. We do a disservice to ourselves and to the world around us when we don’t take the time to learn from the Holy Spirit, time to sit at the Teacher’s feet and glean from these ancient words the messages they carry. In our fast-paced culture, this approach to reading scripture can feel like a luxury—but it is a luxury we need to indulge in, one that Jesus invites us into, a place of rest for the burdened, the hurried, the spiritually-depleted.

We’re all spiritually depleted—especially when we think we’re not. The riches of the Word are inexhaustible. When we forget that, when we think we understand the meaning of a text (as though there is only one possible explanation and application of the words) we take an arrogant position as one who has been taught rather than one who is continually being taught by the Spirit. I don’t think that most of us intentionally assume this position. But it is the position we take when we cling to our ideas of what these words mean more than we cling to the One who said them.

During my quiet time on Sunday morning, I read a devotional written by Richard Rohr, adapted from Gospel Call for Compassionate Action (Bias from the Bottom). It began this way:

“One of the great themes of the Bible, beginning with the Hebrew Scriptures and continued by Jesus and Paul, is “the preferential option for the poor.” I call it “the bias toward the bottom.”

He later goes on to say, “There is no authentic God experience that does not situate you in the world in a different way.”

As I turned these words over and over in my mind, I wrote this in my journal:

“If my experience with God is just for “me” and doesn’t lead me more deeply into the heart of Jesus for the “other”, into that “bias toward the bottom”, is my experience God at all? Or simply an emotional, feel-good moment that may touch my heart—but may not actually be from God…?”

I have had many experiences, encounters if you will, with God. Encounters that have left me changed, rearranged, and with fresh vision. I believe He comes to each one of us personally and intimately and graces us with moments created for us as individuals. I know that’s true because I could write an entire book full of nothing but the times He has loved me that way. I don’t take Richard’s statement to mean that personal, one-on-one experiences with God are not authentic. I think his point, and certainly mine, is that these experiences are designed for a purpose that is two-fold. I believe God wants us to feel His Papa-love for ourselves—to know it, get familiar with it, so that we can build a relationship with our Father that we can rely on and trust regardless of our circumstances. AND, I believe these experiences are also meant to take us further than ourselves. Meant to teach us to see beyond our own desires and needs. Meant to teach us what agape love looks and feels like so that it can be cultivated within us and carried into the world. Meant to do exactly what Richard wrote: situate us in the world in a different way.

So… to the assertion that there is NO authentic God experience that doesn’t have this effect, we must assume that it is up to us whether we experience Him authentically or not. God is never inauthentic. And He continually comes to us. When we meet His authenticity with our minds and hearts focused on ourselves, we are choosing to only take part of what He offers, which renders the moment inauthentic. To experience anything authentically is to experience it in totality, in its fullness.

I had all of this reverberating in my heart when I arrived at church on Sunday. I had no idea what Pastor John was going to preach about…

Therefore if you have any encouragement from being united with Christ, if any comfort from his love, if any common sharing in the Spirit, if any tenderness and compassion, then make my joy complete by being like-minded, having the same love, being one in spirit and of one mind.(Philippians 2:1-2)

If we have experienced Christ in this way for ourselves, then we are called to relate to others in the very same way. As Luanne wrote, If Jesus is Lord, the only response we can give Him is “yes”. Otherwise we exalt ourselves and our wills above His, and we become our own lords.When we follow Jesus and lay down our own lives in exchange for His life in us, the only response to anything He asks of us is yes. But for today’s purposes, let’s narrow down what we’re saying “yes” to. We are saying yes to relating to others–every single other Image-bearer, no exceptions—the way that Jesus relates to us. Luanne explained in detail what that meant for Jesus. Have we given our “yes” to loving others in that same way?

Before I take that thought further, I want to take us back a bit… Luanne spent some time sitting with these verses, time digging in to really absorb what they mean. I’m going to take us back into verse two to dissect the meaning of the original Greek words because I think what they have to say to us is profound—and profoundly simple.

If you look up the Greek for every word in verse 2 (highlighted above), you’ll find that Paul repeats a couple of words a few times. Almost as if he really wanted his readers to get the point he was trying to make. Our English translations have prettied it up and gone outside of some of the more common meanings of the words, probably for flow and readability’s sake. Here’s how it would read if we literally translated every Greek word:

“…then fulfill my joy to fulfillment by same thinking, having the same love, of one accord, thinking one thought.”

Same thinking. Same love. Of one accord. Thinking one thought. Well, that pretty much does away with any of our notions toward individualism, doesn’t it? I think we hate that part, because we love our independence, and we love feeling like we’re in control. We assume that thinking in the way Paul suggests means we have to agree on everything, vote the same way, come to the same conclusions about every hot-button issue, and that we have to interpret every word of scripture exactly the same way. Is that what I’m suggesting this verse means?

No…and yes.

Luanne talked to us about the way we read scripture through our own lenses & personal biases. We run the bible through a variety of filters—tradition, upbringing, political leanings, privilege, cultural identity, education, etc…–and we can end up on completely different ends of the spectrum from one another.

I’m not suggesting “sameness” as a theological framework because I believe, like author & pastor Carlos Rodriguez does, that “…not one of us owns the full expression of the faith we love. And maybe God made it that way so that we would have to come together.” (Drop the Stones, C. Rodriguez)

What I am suggesting is that we are to have one filter. Jesus. His life, his example and His overarching command that, according to Him, supersedes all the others:

“And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.” (Mark 12:30-31, NLT)

Dear Church… this is our filter. Are we loving God (which we can only do because He first loved us) and is that same love He fills us with pouring out to others?

So… Same thinking. Same love. Of one accord. Thinking one thought. Is this possible? Yes. If our only filter is Jesus, we will land on the side of unconditional love. Every. Single. Time. If we run everything through the filter of loving God & loving others, then we will, in fact, have the mind of Christ, because that’s what He did. Luanne and I have talked about love being the bottom line over and over again since we began this blog. That’s not in an effort to avoid the hard way—often times, love is the hardest way. It’s not because we are looking for an easy, pretty, feel-good answer. No. We keep saying it because we really believe it. That the way of Jesus is the way of self-sacrificing love. That justice and shalom are by-products of this love that changes everything. Because real love chooses to be last so someone else can be first. That’s why we drive this point home over and over again.

I think we are free to disagree, to think for ourselves, and to believe differently from one another. And because we are human, and we are on our own journeys toward the completeness God is bringing us into, we won’t ever do this “same thinking” perfectly. There is plenty of grace for that. 

AND… Paul still exhorts us to be unified in our thinking. Pastor John asserted that there should be no contention, no division in the Church if we take this teaching seriously, because we’ll be of one purpose. Does that mean we don’t speak up for justice, have discussions about politics, and hold to traditional values that devalue other human beings? Because these types of conversations are creating plenty of division and contention lately.

What about things like the immigration crisis, refugees, mass incarceration, poverty, LGBTQ+ inclusion in the church, women in leadership, religion and politics, kneeling for the anthem, police brutality, racism, nationalism, allocation of wealth, prayer in schools, abortion, sexual addiction, human trafficking, mass shootings, gun control, left vs. right, and so many other topics that daily flood the headlines? How do we get to a place of unity around all of that?

Remember our filter? If we are loving like Jesus, if we have a “bias toward the bottom” like He did (and does), if we are putting people above agendas, if we are humbling ourselves and choosing to bow our knees to the ways of Christ and His Kingdom, I believe we will come to a place of unity. We tend to look at situations as having one right way and one wrong way. But Jesus is continually bringing us into a different way. His way. A third way. A way that is always counter-cultural and unexpected. A way that got him into plenty of trouble when He walked the earth. Dallas Willard wrote, in the introduction to his book The Divine Conspiracy, “Jesus and his words…are essentially subversive of established arrangements and ways of thinking.” He calls His followers to imitate His ways. And Paul reminds us in Philippians what that way looks like. I wish we had time to dig into the Sermon on the Mount and, specifically, the Beatitudes, but it’s time to wrap this one up.

Dear Church… if we can do this, if we can be the example of love in action and be the first to bend the knee to our Lord and say yes to His ways rather than arrogantly shouting our “rightness” in the face of others’ “wrongness”, then verses 3-5 are a natural result…

We won’t do anything out of selfish ambition or conceit. We will value others above ourselves and put their interests first. We will relate with one another with the mindset of Christ. The Christ who comes alongside of us, connects & unites us in His love-and invites us to do the same.

–Laura

mother teresa

rich mullins quote

The Battle: Armor of God (Part 2)

 In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people. Pray also for me, that whenever I speak, words may be given me so that I will fearlessly make known the mystery of the gospel, for which I am an ambassador in chains. Pray that I may declare it fearlessly, as I should. (Ephesians 6:16-20 NIV)

I can’t count the number of times I have heard/read/studied/thought about the armor of God before I experienced this series. Suffice it to say, the number is quite high. The temptation, when we are presented with a familiar text or story, is to tune out and listen half-heartedly through the filters we have always had in place. I have been learning so much over the last year, especially, about how dangerous it is to default to my traditional understanding and maintain old filters–especially as it relates to Jesus and His Kingdom. Because of this, I try to be intentional about NOT tuning out when the story is familiar. And I am so grateful that I was able to listen to this series–and especially this final installment–with my heart wide open, filters set aside. Because my old understanding is  now being replaced with a more complete understanding, one that is filtered through one lens alone: Jesus.

Pastor John’s message on Sunday covered the remaining pieces of armor: the shield of faith, helmet of salvation, and sword of the Spirit. As he preached on each piece, my mind was blown over and over again. My perception of doing battle God’s way has been forever changed.

In last week’s verses, Paul instructed us to stand firm with: the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness and the shoes fitted with the readiness of the gospel of peace. He told us to clothe ourselves in them. We are to take–to grab onto, raise up–the remaining three pieces of armor. As we’ll see moving forward, the last three connect to the first three.

The first piece of armor that we are to “take up” is the shield of faith. The definition of the word translated “faith” here (pistis) is “firm conviction of the truth“. Our shield of faith hangs on our belt of truth. Last week, Luanne wrote:

“When speaking of “truth” it is incredibly important that we acknowledge that Jesus is truth…The belt held it all together. The Truth holds us all together…The real Jesus brings us all together and holds us all together, so that His Kingdom can come on earth as we, the capital “C” church, stand firm against the one enemy together”.

Our faith hangs on Jesus–the truth of who He is. It’s what holds us all together, as Luanne identified. The importance of our “togetherness” in Jesus is not only highlighted in the belt of truth, but also in the shield of faith that hangs on it. The Roman shield was a huge piece of armor, crafted out of wood, bronze, and animal skin/leather. As large as it was, though, it only covered two-thirds of the soldiers body when it was held correctly. What about the other third of his body that was vulnerable to attack? It was covered by his neighbors shield. And he covered the exposed parts of the neighbor on his other side with his shield. That’s how it was designed to work in battle. If they didn’t use their armor correctly, they and their comrades would find themselves exposed and vulnerable to enemy attacks. So it is with us…

Our faith, our conviction of the Truth–of Jesus, is incomplete if we choose to stand alone. Many cultures understand this. They model the type of togetherness that we’ve referred to several times throughout this series. Our Western, American, mostly white breed of Christianity, however, is not very good at this. There is a tradition of individualism in the West, and we have applied it to our faith. It has left us exposed and vulnerable to our enemy, because our model of faith hasn’t accepted or included (much less practiced…) “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31). We have been taught, and we still teach, that our faith is a personal one, that it’s “between you and God”. We have taken pride in our personal piety, and wondered why so many are hesitant to accept our message. We will explore this further in a moment, when we look at the next piece of armor. Before we move on, though, I want to emphasize that our faith is meant to be lived out in the context of community. It’s what Jesus and His disciples modeled. It’s how the early church in Acts expanded. It’s what you see in churches that are thriving rather than dying today. It’s how the Kingdom works. It’s the Jesus way, the abundant life way, the way that draws others in rather than pushing them away…

Which brings us to our next piece, the helmet of salvation. The helmet was the most notable piece of the Roman soldier’s armor. Not only did it protect the entire head, face, and neck area, but it was dramatically decorated, meant to be seen and noticed. For us, our helmet protects our mind, the place where our thoughts are formed. It is referred to as the helmet of salvation. Many of us have grown up with the understanding that our salvation is the moment we accept Jesus and give our lives to Him. It’s our ticket to Heaven. And just like our faith, this is generally a personal experience. We may share it publicly from the front of a church and declare it through baptism, but that’s as far it goes for many of us.

It’s very easy to think about our helmet of salvation as something to hide under. We feel protected because we are “saved” and we live from that place. Not only do we secure our helmets to keep out everything that doesn’t line up exactly with the way we understand salvation, but we add masks to the helmet–masks of performance, good behavior, and all the “shoulds” of false identity. If this helmet is decorated or notable at all, it is with the feathers of pride and the plumes of self-righteousness. This is not what the helmet of salvation is meant for. The meaning of the word “salvation” in this context embodies the process of being saved and bringing that salvation to others. It implies the understanding that we are works in progress. Again, this works best within community. Standing on our own, hiding behind a false identity, projecting a picture of perfection, of having already “arrived”, not only keeps us trapped in our own self-deception, but it pushes others away rather than drawing them in.

We don’t have to look very far in today’s culture to see this playing out in real time. We see many who have been “saved” and are now hiding under the false identity of perfection and rightness. This identity tends to include black and white thinking and makes harsh judgments about everything and everyone that doesn’t align with that way of thinking. Helmets that look like this are notably decorated, easy to see towering above the crowd, but they don’t bring salvation to others. What draws others in is acknowledging that we are continually being saved, transformed and made complete in Jesus; that we are not perfect and we know it, and we can be authentically who we are because we know that we are accepted and approved of just as we are by the God who made us. That is the salvation that our helmets are meant to be decorated with, what ought to be notable about us. It’s not about us at all–it’s about those around us being able to see Jesus when they look at us. Because, remember, Jesus is our armor.

I said earlier that each piece of armor we looked at this week connects to a piece we studied last week. The helmet and the breastplate go together. They protect our two most vulnerable places: our minds and our hearts. We are told repeatedly in Scripture to guard both. Both are protected by the assurance we have that as we are continually being saved and transformed–as we authentically submit to Jesus as Lord, and to His process, His ways–we are fully accepted and rightly related to God.

This brings us to “the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God”. This final piece of armor is the most intriguing of them all. Before I explain what we learned, I want you to think about your understanding of this piece of armor. What have you always been taught? What Sunday school picture comes to mind? Is it a picture of the Bible? Maybe with a cartoon soldier holding it, ready to wield it against the enemy? What if I told you that understanding is inaccurate?

My understanding has always been what I just described. It’s part of why I was taught that I should memorize Scripture, because God’s word is my weapon. Please know that I am absolutely FOR memorizing Scripture; I think it’s so important to know it. But that understanding in all its familiarity, is not what Paul originally wrote. This “word” is “rhema”, the spoken word of God.  As Pastor John reminded us, Paul, Peter and the other apostles of the early church were not carrying around a New Testament with them, teaching verses from the Bible we have today. They spoke the words that the resurrected Jesus had directly spoken to them, the words that had resurrected and changed their lives. That was their sword.

We learned last week that the “shoes fitted with the readiness of the gospel of peace” are actually a formidable weapon to trample on our enemy, because what they are is our story of how Jesus came and brought Shalom to destroy his chaos-making authority in our lives. Our story of transformation is what we stand on because no one and nothing can refute what Jesus has done in our lives. They are our stories and we triumph over our enemy “by the word of [our] testimonies” (Revelation 12:11).

As you have probably figured out by now, these shoes are connected to our sword. Our stories–the very things we often try to hide and see as our greatest weakness, when they are transformed by Jesus and we bind them to our feet and stand firm in the truth of our transformation–become our sword, our greatest strength. Because our story is made up of the words Jesus has spoken to us. The words of peace that have brought wholeness to our lives and calmed the chaos inside of us. These words from Jesus are what we are to carry and speak to others.

I’ve heard it said that we need to “speak our piece”. We use that when we have to vent or get something out. Often, it’s this same mentality that leads us to beat people over the head with our bible verses, to talk them into submission, if you will. What we are actually called to do is to “speak our peace“. Share the words that Jesus has spoken directly to you, the story of how His resurrected life has resurrected your life. This is what we carry. The sword of Shalom. 

Jesus tells His disciples-and us-in John 14:27, “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid“. And Ephesians 2:14 says this: “For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility...” In these verses, we are reminded that Jesus IS our peace. He speaks peace, He brings peace, He embodies peace. Peace is the way of His Kingdom. Not violence. Both of these verses use the Greek “eirene”, the Greek equivalent to the Hebrew “Shalom”. We fight with the sword of Shalom. We share the peace and wholeness that we have experienced as the life of Jesus has resurrected our lives. We speak what He has spoken to us.

What has Jesus spoken to you? Are you carrying a sword that you need to lay down, so that you can pick up the sword of Shalom?

–Laura

I have sometimes wondered why God chose for Jesus to come and His church to be birthed during the time when Rome was conquering the world by abusing their power and  using tactics of intimidation, fear, while committing ruthlessly destructive, cruel and inhumane acts– they were a dominating force.  Without a doubt, their weapons of warfare were powerful in the earthly realm. Their weapons stand in stark contrast to the weapons of the Kingdom of Heaven and become beautiful and easily understandable illustrations for Paul to use when describing the armor of God. The weapons of our warfare are not the weapons of this world (2 Cor. 10:3 )  God flips the world’s system on its head. Maybe He chose the Roman time period for Jesus and His church to be born, in order to contrast how very different the Kingdom of Heaven on earth is from the Empire of Rome and its human system of domination.

It’s important to understand the meanings of the seemingly insignificant words in the “armor” verses, so keep in mind that “with” means put in its proper place (belt, breastplate, shoes), and “take up” or “take hold of” means grab, hold tightly, raise upLike Laura wrote above, all six pieces of armor are intricately connected.

With the belt of truth in place we take hold of the shield of faith.

As we’ve mentioned, and I am mentioning again–Jesus himself is THE truth (John 14:6). The Roman shield was made up of three parts, a wooden core encased in bronze and the whole thing was covered with animal skin which was then soaked in water so that any fiery darts that came would be extinguished. The shield was meant to protect the soldiers from aerial assault. There is much symbolism for us in the shield. All the way back in the book of Genesis, after Adam and Eve had believed Satan’s lie and decided to take life into their own hands they ended up aware of their nakedness and vulnerability. They suffered tremendous consequences for choosing their own way; yet God still cared for them. In Genesis 3:21 we see that the Lord God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them. Biblical scholars see this as a foreshadowing of Jesus’ sacrifice. A death (the first death) was required for Adam and Eve to be covered. The death of Jesus was required for us to be covered so that we can be clothed in Him. (Heb. 9:22 …without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness). The fact that the animal skin was then soaked in water reminds me of Jesus’ words whoever drinks of the water I give them will never thirst– indeed the water I give them will become a spring of water welling up to eternal life. (John 4:14). The verb tense that Jesus used indicates continual drinking….whoever comes continually… Is it possible that the soaked shield is an illustration of baptism by immersion in the Spirit? When we continually come to Jesus -clothe ourselves in Him-we are filled with the Holy Spirit and our shield is soaked and ready to extinguish the fiery darts of the enemy which come our way from the heavenly realm. And as Laura mentioned above…our shield is not only for us individually. The Roman soldier held his shield above his head with his left arm. It covered 2/3rds of his body and 1/3 of his neighbor’s body. The formation only served to protect if each soldier did his part.

Do we see how vital it is that we understand this? None of us gets to sit this out. We are part of an advancing Kingdom based on the Truth of God’s love and revelation- carried out by faith–the conviction that Jesus is Truth and worth knowing. That conviction moves us to action, that conviction leads us to continually soak ourselves in Him, clothe ourselves in Him and move together side by side, supporting and protecting one another with the goal of advancing His kingdom.

With the breastplate of righteousness in place we take up the helmet of salvation.

With our heart protected by the covering of the righteousness of Christ, believing His truth that we are completely accepted by God, we can take up the helmet of salvation. Laura wrote above:

“The meaning of the word “salvation” in this context embodies the process of being saved and bringing that salvation to others. It implies the understanding that we are works in progress. Again, this works best within community..”  

This is an important concept for us to grasp. Not too long ago I heard someone say that when Jesus talked about the Kingdom and Paul talked about salvation, they were referring to the same thing–both are about belonging. Without the sacrifice and resurrection of Jesus, there is no salvation, no belonging to the Kingdom of God–interesting thought.

The process of working out our salvation must be grounded in Truth, and the mind is where much of that battle takes place. Paul encourages us to renew our minds-change the way we think (Romans 12:2), to think about whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. (Phil 4:8), and tells us that letting your sinful nature control your mind leads to death. But letting the Spirit control your mind leads to life and peace. (Rom 8:6)  All of our actions begin with thoughts, which is why Paul tells us to take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ (2 Cor 10:5) which comes two verses after the weapons we fight with are not the weapons of this world. 

In the New Testament, the word translated as “repent” is metanoia which actually means to change one’s mind for better, to think differently. Taking up the helmet of salvation is imperative in the spiritual battles that are all around us, remembering that the way we battle looks NOTHING like the way of the world. Brennan Manning, in his book The Signature of Jesus, writes:

“The other side of metanoia is paranoia…(which) is characterized by fear, suspicion, and flight from reality…. Spiritual paranoia is a flight from God and from our true selves. It is an attempt to escape from personal responsibility. It is the tendency to avoid the cost of discipleship and to seek out an escape route from the demands of the gospel. Paranoia of the spirit is an attempt to deny the reality of Jesus in such a way that we rationalize our behavior and choose our own way. …None of us is immune to the seduction of counterfeit discipleship…” 

I find the comparison between metanoia and paranoia very helpful in determining whether I’m thinking with the mind of Christ or the mind of the flesh. Both types of thinking produce fruit. Galatians 5:19 lays out what the mind of the flesh leads to: sexual immorality, impurity, lustful pleasures,  idolatry, sorcery, hostility, hatred, quarreling, jealousy, outbursts of anger, selfish ambition, dissension, division, envy, drunkenness, wild parties, and other sins like these, contrasted by the mind of the Spirit which leads to love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.(v.22) A tree will be known by its fruit. (Luke 6:44)  It’s really clear in scripture what type of fruit the true helmet of salvation leads to, and it is fruit that values people,  treats them well and draws them toward Jesus. 

With your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace we take up the sword of the Spirit which is the SPOKEN word of God.

I loved how Laura contrasted “speak our piece” (mind of flesh) with “speak our peace”, (mind of the Spirit).  Our story of peace with Jesus becomes the powerful offensive weapon of the sword of the Spirit. The Romans traded their long swords for shorter ones when they learned from the Spaniards army short swords were more precise and effective. They were always ready with those short swords tucked into their belts. Are we always ready to share our story of peace precisely and effectively? People can argue scripture all day long, but our personal stories of transformation are hard to argue against. And…it doesn’t have to be long and drawn out. A sentence here, an offer of prayer there, an act of kindness, an offer of grace/forgiveness, a different thought process, all of those sown seeds will begin to bear fruit over time earning us the right to share more fully who Jesus is and what He means to us personally. The Holy Spirit will teach you at that time what you should say (Luke 12:12), so if He brings it to mind-say it!  And, if you’re walking with Jesus, it’s not a story of what He did one time when you surrendered your life to Him, there are fresh encounters to share always. Salvation is an ongoing, ever fresh process.

Paul wraps it all up by telling us to pray four times in two verses. Pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people. Pray also for me, that whenever I speak, words may be given me so that I will fearlessly make known the mystery of the gospel,  for which I am an ambassador in chains. Pray that I may declare it fearlessly, as I should.  (Eph 6:18-20)

One final thought–our battle is not against flesh and blood, it is for flesh and blood–body, soul and spirit. Jesus told Peter that upon Peter’s confession of Jesus as Messiah the church would be built, and not just built, but strong and powerful enough that the gates of hell will not prevail against it. (Mt 16:18)  If you are in Jesus, you are part of His church. You belong to His kingdom. His kingdom is advancing. We fight together with His weapons which are totally contrary to the weapons of this world. We fight together, not just with those in our local communities, but with Jesus’ followers all across the globe. We are one family with Jesus’ followers in Honduras, Mexico, Haiti, Zambia, Syria, Russia, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Brazil, Madagascar, China, Vietnam, and every other country in the world. Jesus calls us to oneness, unity–but not uniformity. The way we carry out our mission may look different, but our Jesus must look the same. We must know Him, the real Him. Not the Jesus of our specific culture, but the Jesus who transcends all culture, the Jesus who reveals the God who loves the world. He is The TRUTH; we must know who we are IN Him, we must be in the constant process of renewing our minds so that we can be more LIKE Him, and be ready at all times to DECLARE our experience with Him. We do this in the power of His Spirit and with the camaraderie of one another, praying for one another, protecting one another, forgiving one another, and loving the world together into His Kingdom.

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God, so that… 

Are you in?

–Luanne

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The “Worldly” Battle

Pastor Beau brought us the second installment of our series, “The Battle”, on Sunday. He preached about what it means to be in the world but not of it, and shed some light on a few passages of scripture that are often misrepresented and taken out of context. But before we launch into this week’s discussion, let me recap key points from week one.

Beau reminded us that we have a real enemy, and that there are spiritual battles going on all around us-whether we believe in it or not. He reminded us of the story of Elisha and his servant from 2 Kings 6–how God, in response to Elisha’s prayer, opened the servants eyes so that he could see the spiritual army that surrounded them. We were reminded that we have the weapon of prayer and that it makes all the difference when we choose to use it in the midst of our battles. Beau also reminded us that we fight from victory–not for it. God wins. But we have an enemy who wants to take as much ground as he can. He wants the hearts of those who haven’t yet surrendered to Jesus, and he wants the focus and attention of those who have. And he brought us back to Ephesians 6:12 to remind us that,

…our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms“.

I don’t know about you, but I sometimes often struggle to remember that my battle isn’t with people… I needed to hear Pastor Beau’s message on Sunday to remind me who my real enemy is. I needed (and probably daily need…) the reminder that we will destroy our own allies if we don’t recognize the truth about the battle we’re in. Beau told us that all of humanity has been invited to be on the same team–we weren’t created to fight against one another. But I think that we get confused about this because we misapply verses like Romans 12:2a:

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.

Beau asserted that our understanding of this verse, and others like it, inclines us to separate people. To draw a hard line between us and them-the “saved” and the “others”. We see the word “world” and use it to point the finger at one another, forgetting that “…our struggle is not against flesh and blood…“. We take the phrase “in the world, but not of it” and use it to isolate ourselves from other human beings created in the image of God.  2 Corinthians 4:4 tells us that, “The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.”  This verse reminds us that for a time, the god of this age (Satan) rules over the physical world. It is his way of life that permeates this age. And he wants to tempt and coerce all of us into adapting to his way. Pastor Beau told us that a better way to read Romans 12:2 would be to understand “world” defined (in this particular verse only) as “the lifestyle of the enemy”. This is what we are to resist, to be set apart from: the ways of our enemy, the tempting lifestyle he dangles in front of our desires.

I used the phrase, “in the world, but not of it” above. It’s a popular phrase, one that’s been used in church, by Christians, and is often quoted as scripture. It’s not. It is pulled from the prayer that Jesus prayed for his disciples and for all believers in John 17:

I have given them your word. And the world hates them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I’m not asking you to take them out of the world, but to keep them safe from the evil one. They do not belong to this world any more than I do. Make them holy by your truth; teach them your word, which is truth. Just as you sent me into the world, I am sending them into the world. And I give myself as a holy sacrifice for them so they can be made holy by your truth. “I am praying not only for these disciples but also for all who will ever believe in me through their message. I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us so that the world will believe you sent me. (John 17:14-21) 

These are the key verses from Beau’s sermon. Can you see where the “in the world but not of the world” concept came from? You can absolutely pull that thought together from these verses, but to boil this passage down into that one phrase does a massive disservice both to Jesus’s main point and to our understanding of what He was really saying.

When we read this passage and our takeaway is to isolate from “worldly” people and experiences, I believe the enemy celebrates. He celebrates every time we choose separation over connection. So I believe that part of his lying, deceiving lifestyle is attempts to keep us boxed in by our shallow understanding. He appeals to our desire to be “safe”, to be “separate”, “set apart”. If we are choosing to isolate in an effort to draw a line between us and the world, we are making a choice to be ineffective.

But Jesus, He is all about connection…

“I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us…” 

That’s a lot of connecting. And that is always His way for us. We see it all over in Scripture. And why does He want us to be one with each other and with Him and the Father?

“…so that the world will believe you sent me.”

Jesus prays that we will be one so that the world will believe. He prays,  “…I’m not asking you to take them out of the world, but to keep them safe from the evil one.” The one we’re actually fighting. His ways. Not each other. Not other people who haven’t met Jesus yet. The evil one. And then He prays, “Just as you sent me into the world, I am sending them into the world.” Jesus sends us, His followers, into the world to fight the “worldly” battle. To fight against the ways-the lifestyle-of our enemy. In order to do that though, we have to live connected. Connected to Jesus, through His Spirit living in us, connected to one another, not isolated, and connected to the the layers of ourselves, too. We are three-part beings, made up of body, soul and spirit. When these parts are disconnected from each other–when our spirit is not in control of our bodies and souls, and not submitted to the Holy Spirit within us, things get messy. The enemy’s lies and temptations get in more easily, and separation and isolation begin to look more appealing than connection. Beau said that if we want to win our spiritual battles, like Elisha, our physical and spiritual eyes have to be connected. It’s all about connection. Our enemy knows this. So he spends his energy trying to separate us. From ourselves, from God, from fellow Jesus-followers, and definitely from those who have yet to call on Jesus as Lord. 

Both Jesus and Satan are calling to us to live their way. The voice of our enemy will always call us to separate. It carries the tune of pride, and appeals to our arrogance and desire for control and safety. The voice of Jesus will always draw us to a place of connection, communion. And if our spiritual order is out of whack, we’ll resist this voice. Because connection requires humility. Dependence. Vulnerability. Risk. Brokenness. Trust… None of which we embrace naturally or willingly. That’s why I think the second half of Romans 12:2a is the part we should emphasize… Here it is again, from the NLT:

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think

Pastor Beau concluded his message with the statement “Jesus changes everything”. He told us that this is the only reason we have a fighting chance in the battle, the only reason we get to fight from victory rather than for it. Jesus does change everything. If we open up our lives to Him and invite Him to have His way in us. How do we become people who see differently, who live with our spiritual eyes connected to our physical ones? We let Him transform us into new people by inviting Him in to change the way we think. The Jesus way, this upside-down Kingdom he modeled and asks us to carry to the ends of the earth–it doesn’t make sense to our physical minds. It is understood only in the realm of the spiritual and then it can connect to, and be made manifest, in the physical. Jesus never stood at a distance from the people who needed Him most. He knew His battle wasn’t against them. He came for them. For you. For me. His enemy was and is the same enemy we fight today. The battle is not against those who haven’t yet met God-it’s against the one trying to keep them in that place. We have to get this right, friends. Our battle is not against flesh and blood. It never has been and it never will be. And every time we choose to fight against another Image-bearer, we give a little ground to our very real enemy. Jesus calls us to a different way-His way. The way of connection, communion, oneness. It’s the way the world will come to know Him. And it’s the way we walk in victory over our enemy. I choose His way-even when everything in me wants to do it my way. Will you join me?

–Laura

Highlighting some of the verses that Laura highlighted above we are reminded that:

Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Eph. 6:12

The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. 2 Cor. 4:4

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Rom. 12:2 NLT

(or with the new understanding Pastor Beau brought: Do not conform to the lifestyle of the enemy, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think.)

Jesus himself refers to Satan as the ruler of this age in John 12:31, 14:30, and 16:11. Jesus reminds us that Satan has no power over him, and that Satan already stands condemned. Satan is totally defeated–We don’t fight for victory, we fight from victory. The battle has already been won.

Pastor Beau took us back to 2 Kings chapter 6 and reminded us of Elisha’s prayer asking God to open the eyes of his servant, which God did. The servant who was only seeing with his physical eyes, could all of a sudden see behind the thin veil into the spiritual realm. When the servant saw with spiritual eyes, his mind about their battle changed dramatically–he was thinking differently. His mind was no longer blinded.

The next part of the story is fascinating. Elisha asks God to physically blind the enemy soldiers, which God does. Then Elisha leads them into a death trap. He asks God to restore their sight, which He does. The soldiers realize that things don’t look too good for them. The King of Israel asks Elisha if he should kill them. Remember–this is Old Testament, Old Covenant season–yet Elisha acts in a very New Testament way. His response?

“Do not kill them,” he answered….  Set food and water before them so that they may eat and drink and then go back to their master.”  So he prepared a great feast for them, and after they had finished eating and drinking, he sent them away, and they returned to their master. So the bands from Aram stopped raiding Israel’s territory.  (2 Kings 6:22-23)

Elisha, who was fully aware that the battle was spiritual, responded with the spiritual weapons of the Lord  that were powerful enough to bring down strongholds (2 Cor. 10 3-4). Elisha proceeded with incredible grace by providing a feast!  Not bread and water, but a feast! Then sent them on their way. The result? The bands from Aram stopped raiding Israel’s territory.

The whole story blows my mind. It is a complete foreshadowing of the ways of the New Covenant, of the Jesus who tells us to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us. (Mt. 5:44)  Of the Jesus who tells us God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. (John 3:17)

AND in John 17, the beautiful prayer of Jesus that Pastor Beau highlighted, Jesus says  As you sent me into the world, I have sent them into the world. (v. 18),

He concludes his prayer with these words:

Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me.  I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.” (vs. 25-26)

We are sent into the world with the ways of Christ. We are His physical body on earth. Thinking about Elisha’s actions, I am reminded of Romans 2:4  NLT– Don’t you see how wonderfully kind, tolerant, and patient God is with you? Does this mean nothing to you? Can’t you see that his kindness is intended to lead you to repentance?

Does wonderfully kind, tolerant, patient describe us as His people–His body? 

Laura wrote above that we are made of three parts–body, soul, spirit. Our body is literally, our physical body. Our soul includes our mind, our will, our emotions. Our spirit is the part of us that is dead (Eph 2:1) until it is brought to life in Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit who gives life (John 6:63, Romans 6:11)

If my flesh is leading the show, I’m indulging myself and way out of balance.

If my soul is leading the show, it’s not good. My mind can make up all kinds of things that aren’t factual, my will can be stubborn and self serving, and my emotions can lead me far astray. The phrase “follow your heart” is a total soul led phrase–and it’s dangerous. Jeremiah 17:11 tells us The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?  Can anybody else relate to that phrase as true?

The only way the Jesus life works is to submit our alive spirit to the Holy Spirit and let the Holy Spirit lead.  It’s the only way that people will see the kindness of the Lord in us and be led to Him.

Pastor Beau reminded us that the war we are in takes place at the point where our physical world and the spiritual world meet. We really only have two choices. We can choose to conform to the lifestyle of Christ, or the lifestyle of the enemy. There is no neutral. 

In God’s eyes, there is no human being on the face of the planet that we can call our enemy. There are spiritual rulers, authorities, spiritual forces of evil working toward our demise at all times (and the demise of all humans). They hate God and his Image-bearers. When we choose to live with an us/them mentality, we choose the lifestyle of the enemy. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be a soldier on that side of the battle. I don’t want to fight for the enemy.

Are we brave enough to ask God to show us the places that our minds have been blinded? Where our thinking is off? Are we humble enough to allow Him to show us? Are we humble enough to repent–which literally means get a new mind about what He shows us? Are we in tune enough with the Spirit to fight with the weapons of the Kingdom of heaven and fight for all people to be brought into the Kingdom of heaven? Living this way is radical. Taking a stand against the enemy for all people can be misunderstood. Sometimes it doesn’t feel comfortable–but it is always right. Can we see beyond the flesh and into the greater spiritual battle?

Jesus was not sent into the world to condemn it, but to save it. As He was sent into the world, so are we. “As” means in the same way; therefore,  we are not sent into the world to condemn it, but to love it and help people find salvation in Christ. Let’s be about plundering the enemy to populate the Kingdom of Heaven. It’s truly the only thing that matters.

I (Jesus) have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.” (Jn 17:26)

This is our commission–to make Him known.  Are you in?

–Luanne

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