The Lord’s Prayer #1

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy Name, 
thy kingdom come, 
thy will be done, 
on earth as it is in heaven. 
Give us this day our daily bread. 
And forgive us our trespasses, 
as we forgive those
who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, 
but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, 
and the power, and the glory, 
for ever and ever. Amen.
I assume that most of us, regardless of our various upbringings, are familiar with some version of the prayer known as “The Lord’s Prayer.” The above rendition is probably the most common. What is your experience with this famous prayer? Is it part of your prayer life? Did you memorize it as a child? What does it mean to you? We will spend three weeks diving deeply into this prayer that Jesus gave his followers as he taught them how to pray–it will form and teach us, if we let it.
On Sunday, Pastor John shared that this prayer defines and explains what Jesus has been saying throughout his sermon on the mount. We find it in Matthew 6:9-13, right after Jesus talks about what not to do when we pray. Here is that section again, to refresh our memories:
“When you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full.But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.And when you pray, do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.” (Matt. 6:5-8)
After talking through prayer practices that he does not endorse, Jesus says,

“This, then, is how you should pray:

“‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven…” (Matthew 6:9-10)

These twenty-two words are the focus of this week’s message. The rest of the prayer will be covered over the next two weeks. I am grateful we’re taking it slowly through this section of the sermon on the mount. There is so much to explore, to discuss, to thoughtfully consider within these words. We have an opportunity to look more deeply into what might be very familiar to us, an opportunity to hear the words in a new way. If we lean in with open hearts and minds, seeking to learn and be transformed, we will not be disappointed with what we discover. It is my favorite thing about scripture, the way the Spirit comes into the words and brings them to life in fresh, new ways, revealing more than we had seen before.

On a personal note, this prayer has been a key part of my own prayer life for several years. Ever since the concept of “the kingdom” became a focal point of my journey with Jesus, praying “Your kingdom come…” has become an important part of my life. I don’t know that I thought much about it or what it meant when I was younger. It was actually Luanne who brought it to my attention. As she was captivated by this kingdom Jesus brought to earth, and began to share what she was learning, I was captivated also. If you read this blog often, it’s not news to you that both of us are still quite captivated by the kingdom and what kingdom living looks like for Jesus’ followers today–we write about it probably more than any other topic we cover.

Here’s the thing about what I just shared… Though this prayer has become a key daily component of my own prayer life, there is still more for me to discover in these five verses. There is more treasure to mine in these twenty-two words that Pastor John walked us through on Sunday. I love that. I never want any part of scripture to become stale or commonplace to me. I want to keep digging in, to continue to learn and ask for Holy Spirit revelation to breathe fresh, new life into ancient words. There is always more. As evidence to my point, I have wrestled with what to focus on in my portion of this week’s post. There are so many directions to go! One thing Pastor John highlighted stood out to me above the rest, though, so that’s where I’ll spend my time here.

Something I’ve been learning a lot about for the last couple of years is dualistic versus non-dualistic thinking. It’s especially intriguing to me when I look at the ways that dualism has slithered into western, evangelical Christianity, specifically here in the United States. I understand dualism to be either/or, black and white, this or that ways of thinking. It can lead to an us versus them mindset and often divides rather than unites.

Non-dualism, on the other hand, embraces the both/and, and that way of thinking and relating allows us to be comfortable living in the tension of the and. It allows us to think more broadly, more collectively. It connects rather than divides. But non-dualism leaves things a little undefined. To embrace non-dualistic ways of thinking, we have to learn to embrace mystery, to get comfortable with not having all the answers, to allow ourselves to be led beyond our comfort zones. Non-dualism asks us to consider ways of thinking that challenge our previous understanding. I believe breaking free of dualistic thinking is an essential part of growing in our walks with Jesus.

Pastor John introduced two concepts in this week’s passage where, in his words, “Jesus breaks the dualism.” 

The first is in our understanding of how prayer is meant to be handled. Jesus has just finished talking about prayer being something that ought to be done in private, between us and God, not for show… But this prayer focuses on “us”, right? So it’s not an individual prayer? But it’s meant to prayed as a private, individual prayer?

For those of us who have been raised in some version of westernized Christianity, it’s likely we have a very individualized approach to our faith and our prayers. Much of the teaching we grew up with probably focused on our personal relationships with God and our prayer lives probably reflect that.

What Jesus is teaching us in this passage is how to pray individually and collectively simultaneously. We can pray privately, but our focus is not on ourselves. We’ve written a lot about how early Christianity was communal in nature. We have moved so far away from that in our individualism that even praying the way Jesus teaches may not naturally make sense to us. Other cultures who embrace a more community-focused way of life probably aren’t challenged the same way some of us are when reading Jesus’ instructions. It’s so important that we notice and pay attention to the ways our either/or thinking invades even our study of scripture.

Jesus invites us–by beginning this “personal” prayer with the word “our”–to move away from dualism. He does so again in the way he presents God in his opening words. He says, “Our Father,” including all of us in his own father/son relationship with the God of the heavens,”the universe, the world, the vaulted expanse of the sky with all things visible in it” (Strong’s Greek Lexicon). He continues, “…hallowed is your name.” Hallowed means set apart, most holy, above all. 

So in the opening line of the prayer, Jesus identifies God as our collective, personal father, that we–along with Jesus–are in intimate relationship with, and identifies him also as entirely set apart, above all, distinctly holy. So, in which way do we relate to our God? The answer is: both. Right away, Jesus invites his listeners to enter into a new understanding of how to relate with God. Is he our father that we are intimately connected to, or is he altogether set apart, holy, different from all others? Yes. The answer is not an or, but an and.

It matters that Jesus addresses these things right away. It will serve us well to pay attention to what he is revealing. Our walk with God, including our prayer life, is individual and collective. We relate to God as Abba and as the Holy One, sovereign over all. Without a both/and understanding, without allowing Jesus to break into our understanding, we cannot see the bigger, more beautiful, kingdom-focused perspective that Jesus invites us into. This is where we begin. Before we can say “Your kingdom come, your will be done,” with any idea of what that might look like, we need to align ourselves with God and others Jesus’ way.

The entire sermon on the mount up to this point has been teaching us what it looks like to be kingdom-people, beginning with our hearts. In this prayer, Jesus moves our understanding further–beyond heart change and into a community-focused space, where our prayers are transformed as our hearts come into alignment with the kingdom he is introducing.

Where do the opening lines of this famous prayer find us? Where do Jesus’ words land in our minds and hearts? Have we prayed individually with a collective focus? What might Jesus be wanting to transform in the ways we’ve grown accustomed to praying? I look forward to following where Jesus is leading us together, as we continue to explore his words.

–Laura

As Laura wrote above,  I have been captivated by the kingdom of heaven coming to earth for years now. She and I were trying to remember how many years ago my obsession with The Kingdom here and now began–at least eight or nine. I can’t remember what sparked that flame, but even as I write about it now, my heart burns within me and my fingers tingle as I type. I believe that understanding God’s desire to establish his kingdom on earth, right here and right now, is the key to understanding what Christianity is all about.

Laura set us up beautifully for the Kingdom words Jesus taught us when she wrote: Our walk with God, including our prayer life, is individual and collective. We relate to God as Abba and as the Holy One, sovereign over all. Without a both/and understanding, without allowing Jesus to break into our understanding, we cannot see the bigger, more beautiful, kingdom-focused perspective that Jesus invites us into.

A both/and understanding is imperative. Pastor John pointed out that we waffle back and forth between God as our Abba–our daddy, our father and God as the Holy One, the Almighty who is powerful and therefore, (in our minds) sometimes scary. Jesus combines the two…God is close– intimacy with God is possible, and God is Almighty and Holy and completely “other”.
Once we have this understanding, the rest of the prayer makes more sense to us. So here we go. The next fourteen words say: Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Full stop. Read it again. Pray it again. This is God’s desire for earth. 
I don’t know how we miss this, and I missed it for a lot of years; however, a close reading of the gospels shows us that Jesus talked about the Kingdom of God on earth more than any other subject. It was his priority, and he embodied what it looked like in the flesh. In the Sermon on the Mount he is teaching those willing to hear, what Kingdom people look like.
Quick recap: He saw the crowds, went up the mountain, sat down and began to teach.
He started with the beatitudes–this is what my people will look like: Compare the beatitudes to Philippians chapter 2…have this mind (attitude) in you which was also in Christ Jesus…) 
Next: My followers will be salt and light in the world.
Then a reinterpretation of the law that focuses on our hearts and our treatment of others: You’ve heard it said…but I say…  
And then the three when you statements: When you give… when you pray… when you fast…
Right in the middle of those statements, this private prayer, prayed from the position that “I” am part of the “we”, that focuses on God’s will for the entire earth, is taught.
What are we praying when we pray Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven?
I was introduced to an expanded version of The Lord’s Prayer through Word of Life church in St. Joseph, Missouri, that clears it up. In that expanded version, this portion of The Lord’s Prayer says:
Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Thy government come, thy politics be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Thy reign and rule come, thy plans and purposes be done on earth as it is in heaven. 
May we be an anticipation of the age to come.
May we embody the reign of Christ here and now.
This is the deep cry of my heart. God’s kingdom, not ours. God’s will, not ours. God’s government, not ours. God’s politics, not ours. God’s reign and rule, not ours. God’s plans and purposes, not ours. God is the only One who can establish God’s kingdom, yet it has everything to do with us and our understanding of God’s sovereignty and desire for intimacy with us.
God’s kingdom comes through us–through our relationship with God. God is here. Your will be done is what God’s kingdom coming looks like–it comes as we do God’s will.
This is where we struggle. We have to allow the Holy Spirit to examine our hearts as we ask ourselves am I aligning my life with God’s will?  In our individualistic thinking we ask God, what is your will for my life? That’s the wrong question. The right question is God, what is your will?  Period. And then we align ourselves with God’s will.
Jesus is the best example of this. How does Jesus relate to God? He models constant intimacy. Jesus never goes rogue…he does only what he sees the Father doing. (John 5:19). And he tells us to stay connected to him: I am the vine, you (all) are the branches, if you (all) remain in me and I in you (all); you (all) will bear much fruit. (John 15:5). All of those pronouns in the Greek are plural.
What fruit will we bear? The fruit of the Spirit; love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, faithfulness, and self-control. (Gal. 5:22)
We are a people who are to be known for those characteristics.
you are a chosen people. You are royal priests, a holy nation (a kingdom), God’s very own possession. As a result, you can show others the goodness of God, for he called you out of the darkness into his wonderful light.
 Where is the kingdom? (Jesus) was asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God was coming, and he gave them this reply: “The kingdom of God never comes by watching for it. Men cannot say, ‘Look, here it is’, or ‘there it is’, for the kingdom of God is inside you. (Luke 17:20-21 J.B. Phillips)
And to quote Jesus from this very sermon:  “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.”  (Mt. 5:14-15)
The light of the Kingdom of God is inside us. Are we giving light to everyone in the house? Do we look like Jesus? Do we act like Jesus? Do we prioritize who Jesus prioritized? Do we treat others as Jesus did? Do our lives bear His fruit? His kingdom will come and his will be done on earth through us. The world will know that God loves them deeply and unconditionally through us. 
To prioritize God’s kingdom ways comes through an intimate, connected to the vine type of relationship with almighty, Papa, God—our Father. It also comes with an acknowledgment that our allegiance is to his kingdom above all other kingdoms. In the New Testament we see that the Romans prioritized Rome, the Jews prioritized Israel, the Samaritans prioritized Samaria, etc. I’m a citizen of the USA, and I lived in Brazil for a decade. Should I prioritize those countries? If so, which one? No to all of this. When we follow Jesus, we become citizens of the Kingdom of Heaven. Earthly kingdoms have to take a back seat to this.
The Apostle Paul understood this and he wrote:
There is no longer Jew or Gentile, slave or free, male and female. For you are all one in Christ Jesus. (Gal. 3:28)

Put on your new nature, and be renewed as you learn to know your Creator and become like him.  In this new life, it doesn’t matter if you are a Jew or a Gentile, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbaric, uncivilized, slave, or free. Christ is all that matters, and he lives in all of us...Make allowance for each other’s faults, and forgive anyone who offends you. (Col. 3: 10,11-13 NLT)

What categories do you suppose Paul might highlight if he were writing today? Think about it and repent where you need to. (I’m doing the same.)

Citizens of the kingdom of heaven, during the reign and rule of Rome, were beaten, imprisoned, persecuted, falsely accused, killed. They sang in prison, counted it joy to be persecuted for following Jesus, were scattered to other countries as a result of persecution and took the love of Jesus with them, they died in such a way (sometimes in arenas in front of crowds) that they created a holy curiosity about who Jesus was. Their priority was God’s kingdom, and sometimes they paid a high (earthly) price for living that way. Are we willing to pay a high earthly price to be like Jesus? We will be misunderstood. We will be labled as we get rid of labels and as we hunger and thirst for dikaiosynē (equity, justice, righteousness). It might cost us something. Are we willing?

N. T. Wright in his book “God and the Pandemic” writes: ...the Sermon on the Mount isn’t simply about ‘ethics’…it’s about mission….God’s kingdom is being launched on earth as in heaven, and the way it will happen is by God working through people of this sort….When people look out on the world and its disasters…they ask…why doesn’t he send a thunderbolt…and put things right?…God does send thunderbolts–human ones.  He sends in the poor in spirit, the meek, the mourners, the peacemakers, the hungry-for-justice people…They will use their initiative; they will see where the real needs are, and go to meet them. They will weep at the tombs of their friends. At the tombs of their enemies. Some of them will get hurt. Some may be killed. That is the story of Acts, all through. There will be problems…but God’s purpose will come through. These people, prayerful, humble, faithful, will be the answer…

Where, you may be asking, does personal salvation fit into all of this? Rich Villoda’s, in his soon to be published book The Deeply-Formed Life writes:

Eldon Ladd, in his short but seminal book on the gospel of the kingdom, wrote, “The gospel must not only offer a personal salvation in the future life to those who believe; it must also transform all of the relationship of life here and now and thus cause the Kingdom of God to prevail in all the world.” At the core of the gospel, then, is the “making right” of all things through Jesus. In Jesus’s death and resurrection, the world is set on a trajectory of renewal, but God graciously invites us to work toward this future. However, this work is not an individual enterprise; it is one orchestrated by the collected efforts of a new family…” (Emphasis mine)

A new family.

Our Father…Abba’s Kingdom…Abba’s will…on Earth…through us.

–Luanne

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When You Fast…

When you fast, don’t look like those who pretend to be spiritual. They want everyone to know they’re fasting, so they appear in public looking miserable, gloomy, and disheveled. Believe me, they’ve already received their reward in full. When you fast, don’t let it be obvious, but instead, wash your face and groom yourself and realize that your Father in the secret place is the one who is watching all that you do in secret and will continue to reward you openly.” (Mt. 6:16-18 TPT)

When you give to the needy…

When you pray

When you fast

Giving, praying, fasting–three pillars–equal weight–each necessary for Kingdom people–each to be done privately; not for show–each delightful to God’s heart.

This week, in our Sermon on the Mount series, fasting is the subject. I don’t know about you, but in my church upbringing, there was not a great emphasis placed on fasting. I’d heard of it but it was not part of my faith practice. Interestingly though, it was part of my dad’s faith practice and he was my pastor. Maybe I just checked out when the subject came up because I didn’t understand what fasting was about and I didn’t really want to fast. Who knows? However, Jesus makes it clear that fasting is part of following. Fasting is part of being formed into the image of Christ. Fasting is being an imitator of Christ.

As we’ve pointed out, all of the “when you” statements of Jesus, (giving, praying and fasting) were practices in the early church.

In the Antioch church we learn that while they were worshiping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, “Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.”  So after they had fasted and prayed, they placed their hands on them and sent them off. (Acts 13: 2-3). 

In Acts 14 we learn Paul and Barnabas appointed elders for them in each church and, with prayer and fasting, committed them to the Lord, in whom they had put their trust.

Throughout the history of God’s people, we see that fasting was a given.

In the Old Testament:

The entire nation of Israel fasted on the Day of Atonement as they humbled themselves, repented of their sins, and sought God’s forgiveness. (Lev. 23: 27-28)

Moses fasted (twice) for forty days on Mt. Sinai while he was receiving divine revelation from God. (Ex. 34:28; Dt. 9:9-10:10)

Daniel fasted for twenty-one days and at the end of that time received a revelation from God regarding Israel’s future. (Dan. 10)

Hannah, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, King Jehosaphat, David, and others are said to have fasted personally and/or led the nation in a fast.

In the New Testament:

The Prophet Anna never left the temple but worshiped night and day, fasting and praying.  She recognized the infant Jesus and she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Jerusalem. (Lk. 2:37-38)

Jesus fasted forty days before he entered public ministry (Mt 4: 1-11).

The early church fasted.

And, it’s clear in this week’s passage, that Jesus is not asking us to fast, but is giving us guidelines to follow when we fast.

So what happened? Where did fasting go?

According to the C. S. Lewis Institute:  In the early church, fasting was highly valued. Those who could do so fasted on Wednesdays and Fridays until 3 p.m. But in the fourth century, with the rise of Constantine and the end of persecution, the church changed dramatically. Worldliness and institutionalism increased markedly, bringing an emphasis on form, ritual, and liturgy. Fasting became more legalistic and, for many, works-oriented. 

Centuries after the reign of Constantine,  we find ourselves rather anemic when it comes to fasting. We don’t understand it and it’s not part of our regular spiritual practice, and I’m afraid that many times when we do enter a fast, it’s because we want God’s attention and want him to do something for us–in other words, the fast becomes “me” focused rather than God-focused.

What if we were able to shift our focus a bit and come to see fasting as one of the ways that we love God with heart, soul, mind, and strength?

Pastor John reminded us that fasting is removing anything from our lives that has shifted our focus away from God, and making God our priority. Fasting is maybe the greatest way to realign our lives and remind ourselves that God is our priority.

So what do we do? How do we recalibrate?  Paul, in his letter to the Philippians, wrote: I have often told you before and now tell you again even with tears, many live as enemies of the cross of Christ… their god is their stomach, and their glory is in their shame. Their mind is set on earthly things… (Ph. 3: 18-19)

First, we must recognize what earthly things have captured our attention. Is it food, social media, the news, binge-watching TV shows, exercise, energy-boosting substances, addictive substances? What do we seek for comfort? What is it that we think we can’t live without? What habits have captured our heart, soul, mind, and strength?

Are any of these things providing deep soul satisfaction? Are any of them leading to spiritual growth and a deep spiritual life–a deep connection with God?

If we look at the result of many biblical fasts, vision for leadership, for ministry, hearing the voice of God, recognizing God, connecting with God, returning to God, missionary vision, church leadership vision, intimacy with God, unity, and God’s desires being fulfilled were the result of God-focused fasts. Do we want that?

In the C. S. Lewis Institute quote above, we learn that part of what happened to the spiritual discipline of fasting is that worldliness and institutionalism entered the church. They’ve never left and have been detrimental. Another thing that I believe has been detrimental to the church is the emphasis on individualism. We’ve forgotten that God is creating a kingdom, a people, a community, a global movement, a global church. His desire is that we experience abundant life right here on planet earth and love others into his realm.

Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth…

 You are God’s chosen treasure—priests who are kings, a spiritual “nation” set apart as God’s devoted ones. He called you out of darkness to experience his marvelous light, and now he claims you as his very own. He did this so that you would broadcast his glorious wonders throughout the world. (1 Pt. 2:9 TPT)

Each of the three pillars Jesus addresses has to do with kingdom building and our heart attitude, (as does the entire Sermon on the Mount). Intimacy with God matters. A “secret” life with God matters. It is in the secret place that God can do his deepest work in us. We are transformed in the secret place. It is in making God our priority that we learn to love him with heart, soul, mind, and strength, and love our neighbor as ourselves. It’s in the secret place that we become more than church-attenders, we become kingdom-people. It’s not about legalism. It’s not about trying to manipulate God to conform to our will. It’s not about looking spiritual to others. It’s not about going through the motions. It’s about our hearts; it’s about us; it’s about others; it’s about God’s heart and God’s desire for all humankind–and yes, our Father, who sees in secret will reward us.

As I close, let’s check our hearts as we ponder excerpts from Isaiah 58. Let’s allow the Lord to mess in our business a little bit. Even when it’s uncomfortable, His desire is for our good.

Daily they seem to seek me, pretending that they delight to know my ways, as though they were a nation that does what is right and had not rejected the law of their God. They ask me to show them the right way, acting as though they are eager to be close to me. They say, ‘Why is it that when we fasted, you did not see it? We starved ourselves and you didn’t seem to notice.’

“Because on the day you fasted you were seeking only your own desires, and you continue to exploit your workers. During your fasts, you quarrel and fight with others…

Do you think I’m impressed with that kind of fast? Is it just a day to starve your bodies, make others think you’re humble, and lie down in sackcloth and ashes? Do you call that a fast?

“This is the kind of fast that I desire:
Remove the heavy chains of oppression!
Stop exploiting your workers!
Set free the crushed and mistreated!
Break off every yoke of bondage!
Share your food with the hungry!
Provide for the homeless
and bring them into your home!
Clothe the naked!
Don’t turn your back on your own flesh and blood!
Then my favor will bathe you in sunlight until you are like the dawn bursting through a dark night.

 

Let’s give. Let’s pray. Let’s fast. Let’s recalibrate and let go of earthly things by making God our focus and priority. Let’s meet God in the secret place and allow God to love the world through us as he changes us in that place.

–Luanne

Vision for leadership

Vision for ministry

Hearing the voice of God

Recognizing God

Connecting with God

Returning to God

Missionary vision

Church leadership vision

Intimacy with God,

Unity

God’s desires being fulfilled

These are what Luanne listed as the results of God-focused fasts in scripture. Then she asked us a simple question,

“Do we want that?”

Our answers will reveal the condition of our hearts, and whether we actually want to live according to kingdom values… or whether we just like saying that we do.

What is it that you want? What do I want? What do we, collectively, want? What do we think we need? What do we believe we can’t live without? Can we answer these questions honestly? If we can’t answer honestly with our words, the way we live our lives will answer for us. The way we pray… What we give our money to… If, how, and why we fast… these will reveal our hearts and our priorities. Period. Even if we try to appear holy in these areas, our motives will be found out. God knows, of course, but the people around us will find us out, too, if they haven’t already.

If we give begrudgingly, or out of a place of obligation; if our giving is not a passionate response to Jesus’ life within us, an embodiment of his kingdom in our day-to-day lives, it will be evident. If we pray in showy ways with a goal of being seen and applauded for our holiness, and we don’t connect with God in a personal way, our own extravagant but empty prayers will betray us. And if we fast to be seen and acknowledged, to barter with or coerce God to do what we want, if we make it about ourselves rather that prioritizing God’s place in our lives, our fasting is nothing more than an attempt at a transaction, an exchange of services.

1 Corinthians 13:1-3 is filling my mind as I type. I wasn’t planning to go there, but I think I see where this is heading, so please come along with me…

 If I were to speak with eloquence in earth’s many languages, and in the heavenly tongues of angels, yet I didn’t express myself with love, my words would be reduced to the hollow sound of nothing more than a clanging cymbal. And if I were to have the gift of prophecy with a profound understanding of God’s hidden secrets, and if I possessed unending supernatural knowledge, and if I had the greatest gift of faith that could move mountains, but have never learned to love, then I am nothing. And if I were to be so generous as to give away everything I owned to feed the poor, and to offer my body to be burned as a martyr, without the pure motive of love, I would gain nothing of value…

This passage speaks to getting it all right on the outside. Speaking in the tongues of angels, having access to supernatural knowledge and the very secrets of God, living with mountain-moving faith, giving everything for those in need, dying as a martyr–even these extreme displays of faithfulness and commitment are utterly meaningless if our heart motives are not grounded in the self-emptying love of Jesus.

I don’t know how that hits you, but for me, this passage is hard. It’s humbling. It’s a serious heart-check.

I think it’s exactly why fasting–the kind that Jesus desires–is an essential part of our journey with God.

If I had access to the stores of God’s supernatural knowledge, if I were granted understanding of spiritual profundities, if I gave everything I have for the poor–I would probably think my priorities were in order. But here’s the thing… Even the very best things can fill God’s place in our hearts and lives. And it can happen in subtle ways, ways we aren’t even aware of until we set aside some time to get honest with ourselves and choose to take a step back from whatever has been distracting us.

The distractions can be so hard to identify when they seem like good things, when they look like good fruit. But good fruit grows when our roots are planted in the soil of the kingdom and when our branches are both nourished and pruned by the Gardener. Then and only then can we live out the kind of fast that Isaiah 58 outlines. Chains are loosed, injustice is reversed, the hungry are fed, the broken are restored, the lonely are loved, the world is set right only when we ourselves become an outpouring of the kingdom life that Jesus speaks of in the sermon on the mount. There is no other way for Shalom, for restoration, for wholeness to come.

Fasting, in our most basic understanding is abstaining from food. In the Greek, that is the definition. The earliest definition I found in the Hebrew for the word “fast”, the primitive root, means to cover over, or shut the mouth. Working with that definition, ponder something with me…

When we fast, we are abstaining from food, our source of nourishment. We do this to prioritize God. What if we took it even more literally? What if we look at fasting as abstaining from food in order to feast on the flesh of Jesus? Not in some gross, cannibalistic way. But so that his flesh, his being, his way of being in the world, becomes our flesh as we feed on him and all that he is?

Oswald Chambers said,

“God does not expect us to imitate Jesus Christ; He expects us to allow the life of Jesus to be manifested in our mortal flesh.” (emphasis mine)

From Henri Nouwen,

“. . . We are the living Christ in the world. Jesus, who is God-made-flesh, continues to reveal himself in our own flesh. Indeed, true salvation is becoming Christ.”

And Mother Teresa spoke these words:

“Our lives are woven with Jesus in the Eucharist. In Holy Communion we have Christ under the appearance of bread; in our work we find him under the appearance of flesh and blood. It is the same Christ. ‘I was hungry, I was naked, I was sick, I was homeless.'”

Jesus in the Eucharist, Jesus as our primary source of nourishment–this is how we, as kingdom-people, embody the One we follow.

What if when we fast, we ask Jesus to do this? To come into our very flesh, that he might be made manifest within us? What if we ask Emmanuel, God with us, to become our flesh as we nourish on all that he is, so that we become the embodiment of Jesus and his kingdom on this earth? What if we reorient our minds and hearts around Jesus’ robust theology of the kingdom–and fast from all lesser things that grab for our attention? Our prayers will change. Our giving will look different. Our relationship with God will be transformed. Because this is what happens when the kingdom of the heavens collides with earth.

I’ll ask Luanne’s question one more time…

Do we want that?

–Laura

Hungering For God (Matthew 6:16-18) — Saraland Christians

Prayer (Like never Before)

Prayer. How does one even begin to understand it? There are entire books, lots of them, written about how to pray. I’ve read a number of them, I’ve tried a number of the different methods suggested in them. I’ve searched for the “right way” to pray. And I’ve come to the conclusion that the only way to mess up prayer is not to pray.  I’ve let go of formulas, and just show up with a desire to connect with God. Some days I don’t pray a word, I just sit intentionally in God’s presence. Some days I pray with words. Some days I read scripture and converse with God as I read. Some days I intercede for the world and for people I know. Some days I journal. Some days I worship with music. Some days I read the prayers of others and make their words my own.  Most days I ask Jesus what He wants our time to look like that day. Sometimes I feel a strong sense of connection, some days not so much, but my “feelings” aren’t what my prayer life needs to be about. Connecting with my Father (which includes listening) is what prayer is about.

Sunday, in our Like Never Before series, Pastor John had us look at the prayer life of Jesus.  Last week we looked at Jesus’ authority and the long day that He’d experienced. He’d taught in the synagogue, driven out an impure spirit, healed Peter’s mother-in-law, and after dark when  “the whole town” showed up at the house, He healed many and drove out many evil spirits. (Mark 1:21-34). I imagine He was tired at the end of that day. How did he even get all of those people to finally go home so he and his disciples could rest? Do you ever think about things like that? I do.

However, the following day we learn that very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where he prayed. (Mark 1:35). In that moment Jesus was showing us the the priority of His life–His desire to connect one on one with His Father, before any other distractions of the day called to Him.

I am an early morning pray-er. I’ve learned that, for me, starting my day with Jesus, before anyone else is up, works best. However, not everyone rises early and that’s okay. Prayer is not a legalistic activity. It’s not about the time of day–it’s about the connection. Prayer is about our need to connect with the One we are following. Prayer helps us to understand God’s will and God empowers us to carry out His will as we spend time with Him.

What Pastor John showed us Sunday about  Jesus’ prayer life are that His words and actions matched. He connected both soul and body to prayer. And He connected heaven and earth in prayer.

In Matthew 6:5-8,  Jesus teaches us some things about prayer. He says:

And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full.
 But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.
 And when you pray, do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words.
 Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.
In other words–don’t pray to impress others, and just because someone prays out loud doesn’t mean they have an intimate relationship with God. We aren’t in a place to judge the hearts of others, but Jesus did tell us that we can have an idea based on the fruit of people’s lives. Is there evidence of Holy Spirit fruit?
Pastor John even reminded us not to say to people “I’m praying for you”,  or “I’ll pray for you”, and then not pray. Anything that makes us sound good, but not followed through with could be what Jesus was addressing, and our only reward will be that people think we’re great.  Jesus wants us to  spend some alone time with God–connect with Him in solitude–whether anyone else ever knows that we do that or not. And then He modeled exactly that in Mark when he left the house early to go pray. (Note: prayer is not legalistic and corporate prayer is absolutely something that the church does together; however, corporate prayer alone will not sustain us and help us grow.)
When Jesus left the house early, He was involving His physical body as well as His soul in the act of prayer. He got His physical body out of bed. He walked to a solitary place. He got Himself into a position of prayer, and he prayed. There was intention in what He did with His physical body. And then He connected His soul, the part of us that we can’t see–our thought life, our emotions, etc. with God. Pastor John pointed out that it was not outside obligation that caused Jesus to get up–it was the internal desire of His soul that wanted to connect with His Father that caused Him to move.
I find that the longer I walk with God the more I have that internal desire to connect with Him.  Without a doubt, there is some discipline involved in making time to connect with God, but once the discipline has been established, that time of connection becomes as life-giving as food and water. If you haven’t experienced that yet in your walk, don’t guilt yourself, just ask the Holy Spirit to give you the desire, and then follow through with intentionality. I can honestly say that I am not who I used to be. God has changed me, and it has been through my time with Him. I don’t know how He’s done it, but I know that He has. It is true that whatever we are doing with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul. Our inner life is reflected in our outward actions. If prayer becomes a priority, our lives will change.
Possibly my favorite part of prayer is that it connects heaven and earth. Jesus began His ministry by saying “the kingdom of heaven is here”. Somehow we’ve missed the significance of this in modern day Christianity. Our focus has become the after-life and we talk a lot about going to heaven when we die; however, that was not the message Jesus focused on, nor did the Apostles in the book of Acts. The message they preached is that God’s kingdom has come to us—right here, right now.   Jesus taught us to pray “Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven”. He taught us to “Seek FIRST the kingdom of God”-right here, right now. Christianity is not about what happens after death, it is about life right here, right now. We have got to understand this! And, I’ll say it again, we have got to know the real Jesus in order to know what heaven on earth looks like.
I write these next statements gently, knowing that we all wrestle with making Jesus in our image, but we must be willing to recognize when we have done that and change our way of thinking to reflect who He has shown Himself to be.
If the Jesus you follow is connected to a political party, either one, He might not be the real Jesus. Jesus is connected to the “party” of the Kingdom of Heaven.
If the Jesus you follow is not concerned about people who are oppressed, who live in poverty, who live in danger, who are discriminated against, who are treated as less than, and who are unwelcome, He might not be the real Jesus. Remember the lepers, the women, the foreigners, the demon-possessed, the uneducated, the outcasts who were Jesus’ friends and ministry partners.
If the Jesus you follow favors your religious denomination, your nationality, your state, your education, your points of view, He might not be the real Jesus.
If the Jesus you follow is angry about “rights”–the right to pray in public, the right to post the 10 Commandments, or any other “rights”–He might not be the real Jesus. Jesus is gentle, and kind, and concerned about our transformation from the inside out.
Following the real Jesus means that we become like the real Jesus and the kind of people attracted to Him will be attracted to us.
How do we get to know the real Jesus? Connection through prayer, through the gospels, and through the power of the Holy Spirit. Seeking God in this way, leads us to what He says is eternal life. In John 17:3 Jesus prays Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.  
When we know Him, we know God’s will, which is to spread the message that the kingdom of heaven has come to earth, the love of God is available to everyone, we were created with divine purpose and can be part of His kingdom and its advancement on earth…and He’ll lead us every step of the way, showing us our next steps, just like the Father did with  Jesus while they were alone together.
Jesus, while he was still praying in that solitary place, was interrupted by the disciples who said  “Everyone is looking for you!” (Of course they were, Jesus had healed, and delivered people from demon possession the previous night –nothing like this had ever happened before.)  Yet, Jesus replied, “Let us go somewhere else—to the nearby villages—so I can preach there also. That is why I have come. (Mark 1: 37-38)
I imagine the disciples were a little surprised by that. Yet Jesus, in His time with His Father, knew what to do next. I’m sure people were disappointed in Him–He didn’t do what they wanted. But He is Jesus. His life is all about the Father’s will, body and soul, words and actions, connecting heaven and earth–all fueled by connection with God through prayer, and He invites us to do the same. Will we enter in?
–Luanne
Luanne wrote, “It is true that whatever we are doing with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul. Our inner life is reflected in our outward actions. If prayer becomes a priority, our lives will change…”
What we do with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul With the exception of cases of physical disability that can prevent us from doing with our bodies what our souls long to do, I absolutely agree with this statement. We make time and space in our lives to do the things our souls prioritize. Even in the midst of life’s responsibilities and demands, we find a way to do the things our souls desire. It’s how we’re wired. Sometimes the wiring gets crossed though–we’ll come back to that in a minute…
During his message, Pastor John mentioned that whether Jesus needed to or not, His getting up early to pray showed us what He wanted to do–where His heart and His priorities were. We know He was fully God as well as fully man. So we could argue that He didn’t NEED to go away to connect with God. We don’t know for sure how that all worked. But to me, seeing that it’s what he wanted to do, what he longed to do, speaks deeply to my heart and reminds me of my own longing. We come into existence with eternity set in our hearts (Ecclesiastes 3:11), and with an ache for “home” that we can’t really explain… In Jason Upton’s beautiful song, “Home to Me”, he articulates this ache a bit:
“…Before my lungs could breathe, I was alive in you;
Before my eyes were open, before my tongue could speak,
Before the bond was broken between you and me;
You were home to me…
You are where we all have come from,
You are where we long to go…”
Jason writes of a longing we all have, whether we’re aware of it or not. It’s the desire to live in the realm of the kingdom of the heavens, the kingdom Jesus brought to earth with Him–the kingdom that is absolutely available to us, if only we’ll make it a priority, like Jesus did, to plug into it. The last line of Upton’s song is,
“Let the way of Jesus lead us back where we belong.”
This is the opportunity we always have before us. The life of Jesus–His ways–will lead us where we belong, if we choose to follow Him. He showed us how to plug into the power source of His Kingdom. And it all begins with prayer. We are wired for it. But, like I mentioned above, sometimes our wiring gets crossed. We know that Jesus taught us to seek his Kingdom daily, to ask our Father for our daily bread… yet so often we settle for the bread of our yesterdays… And, I believe, this is what leads us to follow an idea of Jesus that is nothing like the real Jesus.
The concept of “daily bread” has cycled through my mind on repeat for about a week now…
I think we sometimes try to master the gift of daily provision. We try and hoard what we’ve been given today, and expect it to carry us into our tomorrows. We want our initial experience with Jesus to “cover” us, and to guarantee our eternity, without any further “plugging in” to His kingdom and His ways. We intuitively know that doing so will change us and our priorities–priorities that, along the way, have covered up our primal longing to connect with the Creator of our souls. But when we eat today’s bread tomorrow, and the next day, and on into the next month, year, decades, etc…, we end up eating stale, decomposing, bread. It makes us sick–and it leads us to follow a “Jesus” that doesn’t exist.
I’m not saying that the bread of yesterday was bad. It was what we needed then. It served it’s purpose for that day. It was intended to carry us to the next day, when we could again go to the source for that day’s bread. Bread doesn’t stay fresh for long. It molds, it rots, it gets stale, it decomposes. But Jesus is the bread of life, right? He won’t ever get stale or rotten, right? Right… IF we stay plugged into Him. But a taste of Jesus, a one-time experience of Jesus, in our imperfect human hands? That can absolutely “go bad” and decompose as the dirt of us mixes with the beauty of Him. This is where theologies that look nothing like His kingdom begin. We must go back to the source, daily, if we expect our relationship with God to stay fresh, and if we expect to grow into people who reflect the One we say we follow.
Luanne wrote, “I can honestly say that I am not who I used to be. God has changed me, and it has been through my time with Him. I don’t know how He’s done it, but I know that He has.” Coming to Jesus daily, knowing He is the daily bread we need, and seeking His kingdom first allows God to do His good work within us and change us in the way Luanne wrote about.
But eating old bread changes us, too. Plugging into our old understanding of Jesus, praying disconnected, formulaic prayers, doing religion for show–all of these are examples of what can happen when we try to make what we were given at first into what sustains us into eternity. We have to keep plugging into our Source. When we come to our God daily, hungry for the Bread of Life and thirsty for Living Water, we tap into the new wine of the kingdom of Jesus… We become familiar with His ways, and we begin to realize that His kingdom is exceedingly bigger and abundantly better than anything we’ve imagined. When this realization dawns on us, we stop trying to make today’s provision last into tomorrow, because we can’t wait for the fresh revelation tomorrow’s bread will bring. Continuing to return daily, remaining fixed in the presence of Jesus, will remind us of our own weakness and smallness as we encounter His power–the power of earth and heaven becoming one in His presence. We begin to see more and more of the heart of our God as we seek Him in prayer. Our own hearts expand, and so does our vision. We begin to see those around us, and we begin to see the stark contrast between the Kingdom of the heavens and the kingdoms of this world.
And… sometimes the presence we encounter in prayer is overwhelming. We know that choosing to follow this Kingdom path will lead us to rearrange our priorities, to be open to being changed at our core–and that can feel like too much. So we choose, sometimes, to choke down the rotting bread of yesterday and tells ourselves that’s good enough for this life. Our actions, words, and mindsets reveal the kind of bread we’re eating, as well as the priorities of our hearts. But we go on filling the ache for “home” with bread that, unbeknownst to us, is making us–and others–sick. Eating the old bread keeps us just full enough to check out, and allows us to mostly silence the cry of our souls for the bread of life that satisfies.
Eating the old bread doesn’t disqualify us from an eternity with Jesus–but it does render our present lives entirely useless for Kingdom purposes. It will keep us from experiencing the empowerment and freedom that only comes when we plug into the Kingdom. Plugging into the Kingdom happens when we follow the way of Jesus and connect with our God through prayer.
Have you been feasting on the maggoty bread of your yesterdays? Are you plugging into a source that has rewired your priorities? Take heart. There is fresh bread available for all of us. Is your heart not in it yet? Just move. Move toward God. He’s waiting for you. Ask Him for today’s bread. Let it carry you today. Then come back tomorrow and ask Him for that day’s bread. And the next day, and the next. The Bread of Life will fill you and heal the sickness of yesterday. And as you connect with “home”, your priorities will change. And you will change. There is no “right way” to pray, to connect with your Father. But Jesus did give us a model of where to begin. Let the way of Jesus lead us all back where we belong…
   Our Father in heaven,
        let Your name remain holy.
    Bring about Your kingdom.
    Manifest Your will here on earth,
        as it is manifest in heaven.
   Give us each day that day’s bread—no more, no less—
   And forgive us our debts
        as we forgive those who owe us something.
 Lead us not into temptation,
        but deliver us from evil.
(Matthew 6:9-13, VOICE)
–Laura
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Dear Church… (Philippians 1:1-11)

Pastor John began a twelve week series on the book of Philippians that will take us through the summer.  Without a doubt, Paul loved this body of believers. They held an incredibly special place in his heart, and he is not shy in telling them so. As is wise with all Bible study, knowing the context of the situation is always a good idea, so it’s important to know how this church began. Why were they so special to Paul?

Acts chapter 16 gives us the background story on Paul’s relationship with the people in Philippi. Paul had tried to go to a couple of different locations, but in Luke’s words the “Spirit of Jesus” kept him from following through with those plans. During this time, Paul received a vision asking him to come to Macedonia–so they went. Philippi was a Roman colony in Macedonia and that became the destination.

Typically when Paul went to a new city he started his ministry in the synagogue. Not in Philippi. He and his companions headed to the river to pray and came upon a group of women, one of whom was Lydia, a business woman and worshiper of God. Paul shared the love of Jesus with these ladies, God opened Lydia’s heart to receive the message, she and the members of her household were baptized and she invited Paul and his companions to stay in her home.

I don’t know how long Paul was in Philippi, but it was the city where he and Silas got in trouble with some wealthy folks for casting a demon out of their slave girl because the demon gave her the ability to make a lot of money for them.

Because Paul and Silas messed with the wealthy folks, they were arrested, flogged and thrown in jail. Instead of complaining about their situation, they prayed and sang, and the other prisoners listened. An earthquake came, all the prisoners chains came off and the doors opened. The jailer was sure they had all escaped and was ready to kill himself, but Paul called out and let him know that they were all still there. This encounter led to the jailer and his family coming into a relationship with Jesus. After Paul and Silas were released they went to Lydia’s house, met with the church and then left the area. He visited Philippi two more times. (Acts 20)

I wonder if the freed slave girl and the jailer were part of the group that met in Lydia’s home and received Paul’s letter? I wonder if the church in Philippi was different from the other churches Paul began, so many of whom were riddled with conflict, because he wasn’t battling a spirit of religion that sometimes accompanied those coming out of the synagogues, and sometimes plagues our churches today. Paul himself had come out of that rule following system–and he knew that trading one set of rules for another was not what following Jesus is about. Following Jesus is all about relationship, and the Philippian church was rich in relationship with Jesus, with Paul, and with one another. Lydia was a kind and gracious woman, the church in Philippi began with her. There’s a lot to be said for all the implications of that.

Paul wrote this letter about ten years after he had originally been in Philippi, and he writes to them from prison. He begins by greeting all of them and offers them grace and peace (Shalom) from God.  Paul moves into assuring them of his prayers for them and tells them that his prayers are full of thanksgiving and joy for them because from the first day he met them they partnered with him in sharing the good news of the love, forgiveness and new life available in Jesus–and they were still doing it. He encouraged them with these words: …being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus. (v.6) 

That’s a verse many of us know extremely well, it gives us hope in the transforming work of Christ, but I think it’s important to note that the “you” in this verse is plural. He is writing to the church referring to  the good work that God began in and through His church in Philippi. Yes, the work He’s doing individually in each of us is important, the mission of the church will not happen without each of us growing in Christ, but like we’ve mentioned before, our individual relationships with Jesus are not just about us. When we surrender our lives to Him, we become part of His kingdom–His body, and together we work to bring others into relationship with Him. So, He who began a good work in you by giving you a place to belong and a purpose in His kingdom/body will be faithful to complete the mission He’s begun.

Paul goes on to express how this precious group of people are always in his heart and how he longs for all of them with the affection of Jesus. Then he tells them what he is praying:

And this is my prayer: that your love may abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight, so that you may be able to discern what is best and may be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ–to the glory and praise of God. (vs. 9-11)

The love Paul is writing about is agape–the unconditional, all encompassing, never ending, totally undeserved and complete love of God, and he is praying that this godly love will flow in abundance , that it will abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight….

What does it mean for our agape to abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight?

Knowledge means just what you think it does, and it comes from the root word meaning to know thoroughly, to know accurately, to understand and perceive.

Depth of insight is a little more unusual. The word  translated into that phrase is used one time in all of scripture, and Paul is trying to convey something important in using this word. It means perception not only by the senses but also by the intellect, discernment, moral discernment, the understanding of ethical matters.

It’s intellect coupled with a deeper sense, a deep intuition, a knowing something beyond intellectual knowing, a sixth sense if you will. The phrase in the definition-the understanding of ethical matters– really catches my attention and my heart.

Agape love is a fruit of the Holy Spirit; we can only have it when we surrender to the work of the Spirit in our lives. As we allow the Spirit to do His work in us, our ability to know and discern–especially in moral ethical matters, becomes clearer.

Pastor John pointed out that love is not blind–God’s love is not blind. God’s love sees all and loves us despite our shortcomings. God’s love runs to embrace the returning prodigal, God’s love shows compassion and forgiveness to a woman caught in the act of adultery, God’s love hangs out with the marginalized, the ones rejected by the religious elite, the outcasts, God’s love reinstates Peter after his denial, God’s love makes a way through the costly death and powerful resurrection of Jesus for us to be in relationship with Him, God’s love knocks the terrorist Saul/Paul off a horse, blinds him, and then transforms his life in such a radical way that Paul gave his entire life to introduce others to Jesus.  God’s love doesn’t look like human love, and God wants His love to be what the world experiences when they experience us–His people.  His love—ever growing, wise, discerning, kind, undeserved, overflowing so that…

Right after the words knowledge and depth of insight is a “so that”.   It reads like this:

…so that you may be able to discern what is best and may be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ–to the glory and praise of God.  

The J.B. Phillips translation reads like this:

I want you to be able always to recognize the highest and the best, and to live sincere and blameless lives until the day of Jesus Christ. I want to see your lives full of true goodness, produced by the power that Jesus Christ gives you to the praise and glory of God.  

The Message translation puts it this way: 

Live a lover’s life, circumspect and exemplary, a life Jesus will be proud of: bountiful in fruits from the soul, making Jesus Christ attractive to all, getting everyone involved in the glory and praise of God.

Our Spirit given agape love produces in us the ability to see, know and discern the truth of a situation on a deep level. Then, being led by God’s indwelling, ever abundant unconditional agape love figure out what the God-like best response is. It may look nothing like the world’s response, because God is all about bringing people into relationship with Him, not about ostracizing and punishing them. If that were His heart, we’d all be hopelessly lost.

Acting on what the Spirit leads us to do keeps us blameless and pure before God because the fruit of righteousness means that we are rightly related with God and rightly related with others. Righteousness in this sense comes from the root word meaning equity which indicates that we are working to make things right for all people everywhere–that type of righteousness comes through Jesus Christ.  When we live and love and see and restore and forgive and esteem and build up like Jesus does, the work that God has begun in us, His people, moves toward completion and God gets the glory for it all.

The implications of Paul’s prayer are huge for us. He is praying that we, His church,  will be bathed and growing in agape love, choosing the best as revealed by the Spirit, working in and through agape love to make this world a better place for everyone, carrying out the mission of Jesus so that God’s kingdom may come and His will be done on earth as it is in heaven for the glory of God.

I will be meditating on and praying this prayer all week. I desperately want to be part of the body that is making Jesus Christ attractive to all…Will you join me?

—Luanne

As Luanne wrote, it is so important to understand the context of what we read in our bibles. The more I study scripture and the deeper I go in my walk with Jesus, the more I realize just how vital this is. It is important because it gives us a more complete picture of what we’re reading, but also because it brings the story of Jesus and His Kingdom alive to us in a whole new way. I found some interesting facts when I looked into the history of the city of Philippi…

Corneliu Constantineanu, a Romanian theologian and university professor, has this to say in his introduction to the book of Philippians in the God’s Justice Bible:

“The Great Roman Caesar Octavian Augustus established the city of Philippi as a Roman colony after a great victory in the battle against Brutus in 42 BC. After another victory over Mark Anthony in 31 BC, he named the city after himself, Colonia lulia Augusta Philippensis. This was in order to announce the good news of his great victory and, at the same time, to honor the great Roman Empire’s accomplishment of justice, peace and security! The Pax Romana, together with Roman law and justice, is the great news that the Roman imperial ideology proclaimed–as the dawn of a new era for humanity, as the greatest good news ever heard! But like the establishment of the city of Philippi, the good news of Roman peace and justice was brought about through violence and war and maintained by force and the subjugation of people.

In stark contrast, the apostle Paul announces the real good news, the gospel--God’s action to put the world right, to bring his peace and justice to this beautiful yet fallen and corrupted world. He has accomplished this not through violence and war but through the self-giving life of Jesus Christ. This is the astonishing story we find in Paul’s letter to the Philippians–the significant and wonderful yet costly journey of God’s redeeming the world and bringing his peace and justice for the entire creation… This is the good news of the gospel that we read in Philippians.

As is always the case, the Kingdom of Jesus stands in complete opposition to the kingdoms of this world. A city that was established through war and violence was transformed by the gospel of peace and the power of Agape love.

Agape love is where the journey begins for each of us. Encountering the unconditional, complete love of God for us is the beginning of our relationship with Him. His real love draws us to Himself and, as Pastor John said on Sunday, plants that seed of Agape love inside of us. It’s the beginning of our journey… but we can’t let it be the end. If Jesus loves me is where we stop, we starve the seed that God planted in our hearts. God is the one that plants the seed, and He also tends it, by the power of His Spirit. I don’t want to jump too far ahead in this series, but we’ll see when we get into chapter 2 of Philippians that,

“…it is [not your strength, but it is] God who is effectively at work in you, both to will and to work [that is, strengthening, energizing, and creating in you the longing and the ability to fulfill your purpose] for His good pleasure”. (Philippians 2:13 AMP)

He is at work in us, and it is He who creates within us the longing and the ability to live His way. But–as we discussed in our last series–it is possible for us to resist and to quench the work of the Holy Spirit inside of us. For a seed to grow, it must be watered, fed, exposed to light; as it begins to grow, it has to be pruned in order to bear the best fruit. If we are willing to submit to the process and understand that this seed of love was never meant to stay buried in the soil of our hearts but, rather, to grow and bear fruit to feed the world around us, then we’ll experience what Pastor John described on Sunday. Our love, gifted to us by our Heavenly Father, will grow. It will grow real. And that real love will change the reality of the world around us. Facts exist all around us. But truth always supersedes fact. Jesus is truth. He is love. And the truth of His love has the power to change any reality. Mine. Yours. And the world around us.

In his introduction to Philippians, Corneliu Constantineanu also writes, “Despite our tendency to limit redemption to our personal salvation and morality, redemption in the biblical narrative implies the entire creation, with the ultimate purpose of human flourishing and well-being for all”. I can’t help but connect his words to what Luanne wrote about the “fruits of righteousness” above:  “Righteousness in this sense comes from the root word meaning equity, which indicates that we are working to make things right for all people everywhere“.

It’s not about “me”. It must be about “us”. The proof that our love is real is that we don’t keep it to ourselves. Just as Paul shared in the joys of community, even from afar, we also are created to be in community, sharing in the goodness of God together, and working to bring the kingdom of our King to every corner of this world. It is the gospel–the gospel Paul brought to Philippi–the only good news with the power to change the world.

“Jesus is the gospel. Just as God brought the good news of justice and righteousness through Jesus, Christians will spread justice around them by following Christ’s example. As they are Christlike, they will be agents of God’s justice in this world. Only as they manifest their heavenly citizenship will they be responsible earthly citizens.” (Corneliu Constantineanu)

The church in Philippi understood what it meant to manifest their heavenly citizenship. It stood in stark contrast to the kingdom of the Romans, and it led them to live out their faith in the way of real love that changed the reality of their region. No earthly ideology has the power to connect all people and bring lasting peace. Only the good news of Jesus and His love for all of us can do that. He has planted the seed of His love in our hearts if we know Him–and left a perfect space for it if we haven’t met Him yet–and He stands ready to tend and grow that seed into flourishing plants that bear fruit to feed the nations. All He asks us to do is open ourselves to His careful hands and let Him. If we’ll lean into His words and His ways, we will begin to see the ways of His kingdom–that it’s never just for us individually. And as that knowledge and depth of insight grows, we’ll see transformed lives become transformed churches that God will use to transform the world. Because the Agape love of God lived out through the followers of Jesus will create the kind of body that Luanne said she desires to be a part of: a body that makes Jesus Christ attractive to ALL. I desire this, too. What about you? Will you join us?

–Laura

 

The Battle: Armor of God (Part 2)

 In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people. Pray also for me, that whenever I speak, words may be given me so that I will fearlessly make known the mystery of the gospel, for which I am an ambassador in chains. Pray that I may declare it fearlessly, as I should. (Ephesians 6:16-20 NIV)

I can’t count the number of times I have heard/read/studied/thought about the armor of God before I experienced this series. Suffice it to say, the number is quite high. The temptation, when we are presented with a familiar text or story, is to tune out and listen half-heartedly through the filters we have always had in place. I have been learning so much over the last year, especially, about how dangerous it is to default to my traditional understanding and maintain old filters–especially as it relates to Jesus and His Kingdom. Because of this, I try to be intentional about NOT tuning out when the story is familiar. And I am so grateful that I was able to listen to this series–and especially this final installment–with my heart wide open, filters set aside. Because my old understanding is  now being replaced with a more complete understanding, one that is filtered through one lens alone: Jesus.

Pastor John’s message on Sunday covered the remaining pieces of armor: the shield of faith, helmet of salvation, and sword of the Spirit. As he preached on each piece, my mind was blown over and over again. My perception of doing battle God’s way has been forever changed.

In last week’s verses, Paul instructed us to stand firm with: the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness and the shoes fitted with the readiness of the gospel of peace. He told us to clothe ourselves in them. We are to take–to grab onto, raise up–the remaining three pieces of armor. As we’ll see moving forward, the last three connect to the first three.

The first piece of armor that we are to “take up” is the shield of faith. The definition of the word translated “faith” here (pistis) is “firm conviction of the truth“. Our shield of faith hangs on our belt of truth. Last week, Luanne wrote:

“When speaking of “truth” it is incredibly important that we acknowledge that Jesus is truth…The belt held it all together. The Truth holds us all together…The real Jesus brings us all together and holds us all together, so that His Kingdom can come on earth as we, the capital “C” church, stand firm against the one enemy together”.

Our faith hangs on Jesus–the truth of who He is. It’s what holds us all together, as Luanne identified. The importance of our “togetherness” in Jesus is not only highlighted in the belt of truth, but also in the shield of faith that hangs on it. The Roman shield was a huge piece of armor, crafted out of wood, bronze, and animal skin/leather. As large as it was, though, it only covered two-thirds of the soldiers body when it was held correctly. What about the other third of his body that was vulnerable to attack? It was covered by his neighbors shield. And he covered the exposed parts of the neighbor on his other side with his shield. That’s how it was designed to work in battle. If they didn’t use their armor correctly, they and their comrades would find themselves exposed and vulnerable to enemy attacks. So it is with us…

Our faith, our conviction of the Truth–of Jesus, is incomplete if we choose to stand alone. Many cultures understand this. They model the type of togetherness that we’ve referred to several times throughout this series. Our Western, American, mostly white breed of Christianity, however, is not very good at this. There is a tradition of individualism in the West, and we have applied it to our faith. It has left us exposed and vulnerable to our enemy, because our model of faith hasn’t accepted or included (much less practiced…) “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31). We have been taught, and we still teach, that our faith is a personal one, that it’s “between you and God”. We have taken pride in our personal piety, and wondered why so many are hesitant to accept our message. We will explore this further in a moment, when we look at the next piece of armor. Before we move on, though, I want to emphasize that our faith is meant to be lived out in the context of community. It’s what Jesus and His disciples modeled. It’s how the early church in Acts expanded. It’s what you see in churches that are thriving rather than dying today. It’s how the Kingdom works. It’s the Jesus way, the abundant life way, the way that draws others in rather than pushing them away…

Which brings us to our next piece, the helmet of salvation. The helmet was the most notable piece of the Roman soldier’s armor. Not only did it protect the entire head, face, and neck area, but it was dramatically decorated, meant to be seen and noticed. For us, our helmet protects our mind, the place where our thoughts are formed. It is referred to as the helmet of salvation. Many of us have grown up with the understanding that our salvation is the moment we accept Jesus and give our lives to Him. It’s our ticket to Heaven. And just like our faith, this is generally a personal experience. We may share it publicly from the front of a church and declare it through baptism, but that’s as far it goes for many of us.

It’s very easy to think about our helmet of salvation as something to hide under. We feel protected because we are “saved” and we live from that place. Not only do we secure our helmets to keep out everything that doesn’t line up exactly with the way we understand salvation, but we add masks to the helmet–masks of performance, good behavior, and all the “shoulds” of false identity. If this helmet is decorated or notable at all, it is with the feathers of pride and the plumes of self-righteousness. This is not what the helmet of salvation is meant for. The meaning of the word “salvation” in this context embodies the process of being saved and bringing that salvation to others. It implies the understanding that we are works in progress. Again, this works best within community. Standing on our own, hiding behind a false identity, projecting a picture of perfection, of having already “arrived”, not only keeps us trapped in our own self-deception, but it pushes others away rather than drawing them in.

We don’t have to look very far in today’s culture to see this playing out in real time. We see many who have been “saved” and are now hiding under the false identity of perfection and rightness. This identity tends to include black and white thinking and makes harsh judgments about everything and everyone that doesn’t align with that way of thinking. Helmets that look like this are notably decorated, easy to see towering above the crowd, but they don’t bring salvation to others. What draws others in is acknowledging that we are continually being saved, transformed and made complete in Jesus; that we are not perfect and we know it, and we can be authentically who we are because we know that we are accepted and approved of just as we are by the God who made us. That is the salvation that our helmets are meant to be decorated with, what ought to be notable about us. It’s not about us at all–it’s about those around us being able to see Jesus when they look at us. Because, remember, Jesus is our armor.

I said earlier that each piece of armor we looked at this week connects to a piece we studied last week. The helmet and the breastplate go together. They protect our two most vulnerable places: our minds and our hearts. We are told repeatedly in Scripture to guard both. Both are protected by the assurance we have that as we are continually being saved and transformed–as we authentically submit to Jesus as Lord, and to His process, His ways–we are fully accepted and rightly related to God.

This brings us to “the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God”. This final piece of armor is the most intriguing of them all. Before I explain what we learned, I want you to think about your understanding of this piece of armor. What have you always been taught? What Sunday school picture comes to mind? Is it a picture of the Bible? Maybe with a cartoon soldier holding it, ready to wield it against the enemy? What if I told you that understanding is inaccurate?

My understanding has always been what I just described. It’s part of why I was taught that I should memorize Scripture, because God’s word is my weapon. Please know that I am absolutely FOR memorizing Scripture; I think it’s so important to know it. But that understanding in all its familiarity, is not what Paul originally wrote. This “word” is “rhema”, the spoken word of God.  As Pastor John reminded us, Paul, Peter and the other apostles of the early church were not carrying around a New Testament with them, teaching verses from the Bible we have today. They spoke the words that the resurrected Jesus had directly spoken to them, the words that had resurrected and changed their lives. That was their sword.

We learned last week that the “shoes fitted with the readiness of the gospel of peace” are actually a formidable weapon to trample on our enemy, because what they are is our story of how Jesus came and brought Shalom to destroy his chaos-making authority in our lives. Our story of transformation is what we stand on because no one and nothing can refute what Jesus has done in our lives. They are our stories and we triumph over our enemy “by the word of [our] testimonies” (Revelation 12:11).

As you have probably figured out by now, these shoes are connected to our sword. Our stories–the very things we often try to hide and see as our greatest weakness, when they are transformed by Jesus and we bind them to our feet and stand firm in the truth of our transformation–become our sword, our greatest strength. Because our story is made up of the words Jesus has spoken to us. The words of peace that have brought wholeness to our lives and calmed the chaos inside of us. These words from Jesus are what we are to carry and speak to others.

I’ve heard it said that we need to “speak our piece”. We use that when we have to vent or get something out. Often, it’s this same mentality that leads us to beat people over the head with our bible verses, to talk them into submission, if you will. What we are actually called to do is to “speak our peace“. Share the words that Jesus has spoken directly to you, the story of how His resurrected life has resurrected your life. This is what we carry. The sword of Shalom. 

Jesus tells His disciples-and us-in John 14:27, “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid“. And Ephesians 2:14 says this: “For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility...” In these verses, we are reminded that Jesus IS our peace. He speaks peace, He brings peace, He embodies peace. Peace is the way of His Kingdom. Not violence. Both of these verses use the Greek “eirene”, the Greek equivalent to the Hebrew “Shalom”. We fight with the sword of Shalom. We share the peace and wholeness that we have experienced as the life of Jesus has resurrected our lives. We speak what He has spoken to us.

What has Jesus spoken to you? Are you carrying a sword that you need to lay down, so that you can pick up the sword of Shalom?

–Laura

I have sometimes wondered why God chose for Jesus to come and His church to be birthed during the time when Rome was conquering the world by abusing their power and  using tactics of intimidation, fear, while committing ruthlessly destructive, cruel and inhumane acts– they were a dominating force.  Without a doubt, their weapons of warfare were powerful in the earthly realm. Their weapons stand in stark contrast to the weapons of the Kingdom of Heaven and become beautiful and easily understandable illustrations for Paul to use when describing the armor of God. The weapons of our warfare are not the weapons of this world (2 Cor. 10:3 )  God flips the world’s system on its head. Maybe He chose the Roman time period for Jesus and His church to be born, in order to contrast how very different the Kingdom of Heaven on earth is from the Empire of Rome and its human system of domination.

It’s important to understand the meanings of the seemingly insignificant words in the “armor” verses, so keep in mind that “with” means put in its proper place (belt, breastplate, shoes), and “take up” or “take hold of” means grab, hold tightly, raise upLike Laura wrote above, all six pieces of armor are intricately connected.

With the belt of truth in place we take hold of the shield of faith.

As we’ve mentioned, and I am mentioning again–Jesus himself is THE truth (John 14:6). The Roman shield was made up of three parts, a wooden core encased in bronze and the whole thing was covered with animal skin which was then soaked in water so that any fiery darts that came would be extinguished. The shield was meant to protect the soldiers from aerial assault. There is much symbolism for us in the shield. All the way back in the book of Genesis, after Adam and Eve had believed Satan’s lie and decided to take life into their own hands they ended up aware of their nakedness and vulnerability. They suffered tremendous consequences for choosing their own way; yet God still cared for them. In Genesis 3:21 we see that the Lord God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them. Biblical scholars see this as a foreshadowing of Jesus’ sacrifice. A death (the first death) was required for Adam and Eve to be covered. The death of Jesus was required for us to be covered so that we can be clothed in Him. (Heb. 9:22 …without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness). The fact that the animal skin was then soaked in water reminds me of Jesus’ words whoever drinks of the water I give them will never thirst– indeed the water I give them will become a spring of water welling up to eternal life. (John 4:14). The verb tense that Jesus used indicates continual drinking….whoever comes continually… Is it possible that the soaked shield is an illustration of baptism by immersion in the Spirit? When we continually come to Jesus -clothe ourselves in Him-we are filled with the Holy Spirit and our shield is soaked and ready to extinguish the fiery darts of the enemy which come our way from the heavenly realm. And as Laura mentioned above…our shield is not only for us individually. The Roman soldier held his shield above his head with his left arm. It covered 2/3rds of his body and 1/3 of his neighbor’s body. The formation only served to protect if each soldier did his part.

Do we see how vital it is that we understand this? None of us gets to sit this out. We are part of an advancing Kingdom based on the Truth of God’s love and revelation- carried out by faith–the conviction that Jesus is Truth and worth knowing. That conviction moves us to action, that conviction leads us to continually soak ourselves in Him, clothe ourselves in Him and move together side by side, supporting and protecting one another with the goal of advancing His kingdom.

With the breastplate of righteousness in place we take up the helmet of salvation.

With our heart protected by the covering of the righteousness of Christ, believing His truth that we are completely accepted by God, we can take up the helmet of salvation. Laura wrote above:

“The meaning of the word “salvation” in this context embodies the process of being saved and bringing that salvation to others. It implies the understanding that we are works in progress. Again, this works best within community..”  

This is an important concept for us to grasp. Not too long ago I heard someone say that when Jesus talked about the Kingdom and Paul talked about salvation, they were referring to the same thing–both are about belonging. Without the sacrifice and resurrection of Jesus, there is no salvation, no belonging to the Kingdom of God–interesting thought.

The process of working out our salvation must be grounded in Truth, and the mind is where much of that battle takes place. Paul encourages us to renew our minds-change the way we think (Romans 12:2), to think about whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. (Phil 4:8), and tells us that letting your sinful nature control your mind leads to death. But letting the Spirit control your mind leads to life and peace. (Rom 8:6)  All of our actions begin with thoughts, which is why Paul tells us to take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ (2 Cor 10:5) which comes two verses after the weapons we fight with are not the weapons of this world. 

In the New Testament, the word translated as “repent” is metanoia which actually means to change one’s mind for better, to think differently. Taking up the helmet of salvation is imperative in the spiritual battles that are all around us, remembering that the way we battle looks NOTHING like the way of the world. Brennan Manning, in his book The Signature of Jesus, writes:

“The other side of metanoia is paranoia…(which) is characterized by fear, suspicion, and flight from reality…. Spiritual paranoia is a flight from God and from our true selves. It is an attempt to escape from personal responsibility. It is the tendency to avoid the cost of discipleship and to seek out an escape route from the demands of the gospel. Paranoia of the spirit is an attempt to deny the reality of Jesus in such a way that we rationalize our behavior and choose our own way. …None of us is immune to the seduction of counterfeit discipleship…” 

I find the comparison between metanoia and paranoia very helpful in determining whether I’m thinking with the mind of Christ or the mind of the flesh. Both types of thinking produce fruit. Galatians 5:19 lays out what the mind of the flesh leads to: sexual immorality, impurity, lustful pleasures,  idolatry, sorcery, hostility, hatred, quarreling, jealousy, outbursts of anger, selfish ambition, dissension, division, envy, drunkenness, wild parties, and other sins like these, contrasted by the mind of the Spirit which leads to love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.(v.22) A tree will be known by its fruit. (Luke 6:44)  It’s really clear in scripture what type of fruit the true helmet of salvation leads to, and it is fruit that values people,  treats them well and draws them toward Jesus. 

With your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace we take up the sword of the Spirit which is the SPOKEN word of God.

I loved how Laura contrasted “speak our piece” (mind of flesh) with “speak our peace”, (mind of the Spirit).  Our story of peace with Jesus becomes the powerful offensive weapon of the sword of the Spirit. The Romans traded their long swords for shorter ones when they learned from the Spaniards army short swords were more precise and effective. They were always ready with those short swords tucked into their belts. Are we always ready to share our story of peace precisely and effectively? People can argue scripture all day long, but our personal stories of transformation are hard to argue against. And…it doesn’t have to be long and drawn out. A sentence here, an offer of prayer there, an act of kindness, an offer of grace/forgiveness, a different thought process, all of those sown seeds will begin to bear fruit over time earning us the right to share more fully who Jesus is and what He means to us personally. The Holy Spirit will teach you at that time what you should say (Luke 12:12), so if He brings it to mind-say it!  And, if you’re walking with Jesus, it’s not a story of what He did one time when you surrendered your life to Him, there are fresh encounters to share always. Salvation is an ongoing, ever fresh process.

Paul wraps it all up by telling us to pray four times in two verses. Pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people. Pray also for me, that whenever I speak, words may be given me so that I will fearlessly make known the mystery of the gospel,  for which I am an ambassador in chains. Pray that I may declare it fearlessly, as I should.  (Eph 6:18-20)

One final thought–our battle is not against flesh and blood, it is for flesh and blood–body, soul and spirit. Jesus told Peter that upon Peter’s confession of Jesus as Messiah the church would be built, and not just built, but strong and powerful enough that the gates of hell will not prevail against it. (Mt 16:18)  If you are in Jesus, you are part of His church. You belong to His kingdom. His kingdom is advancing. We fight together with His weapons which are totally contrary to the weapons of this world. We fight together, not just with those in our local communities, but with Jesus’ followers all across the globe. We are one family with Jesus’ followers in Honduras, Mexico, Haiti, Zambia, Syria, Russia, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Brazil, Madagascar, China, Vietnam, and every other country in the world. Jesus calls us to oneness, unity–but not uniformity. The way we carry out our mission may look different, but our Jesus must look the same. We must know Him, the real Him. Not the Jesus of our specific culture, but the Jesus who transcends all culture, the Jesus who reveals the God who loves the world. He is The TRUTH; we must know who we are IN Him, we must be in the constant process of renewing our minds so that we can be more LIKE Him, and be ready at all times to DECLARE our experience with Him. We do this in the power of His Spirit and with the camaraderie of one another, praying for one another, protecting one another, forgiving one another, and loving the world together into His Kingdom.

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God, so that… 

Are you in?

–Luanne

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The “Worldly” Battle

Pastor Beau brought us the second installment of our series, “The Battle”, on Sunday. He preached about what it means to be in the world but not of it, and shed some light on a few passages of scripture that are often misrepresented and taken out of context. But before we launch into this week’s discussion, let me recap key points from week one.

Beau reminded us that we have a real enemy, and that there are spiritual battles going on all around us-whether we believe in it or not. He reminded us of the story of Elisha and his servant from 2 Kings 6–how God, in response to Elisha’s prayer, opened the servants eyes so that he could see the spiritual army that surrounded them. We were reminded that we have the weapon of prayer and that it makes all the difference when we choose to use it in the midst of our battles. Beau also reminded us that we fight from victory–not for it. God wins. But we have an enemy who wants to take as much ground as he can. He wants the hearts of those who haven’t yet surrendered to Jesus, and he wants the focus and attention of those who have. And he brought us back to Ephesians 6:12 to remind us that,

…our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms“.

I don’t know about you, but I sometimes often struggle to remember that my battle isn’t with people… I needed to hear Pastor Beau’s message on Sunday to remind me who my real enemy is. I needed (and probably daily need…) the reminder that we will destroy our own allies if we don’t recognize the truth about the battle we’re in. Beau told us that all of humanity has been invited to be on the same team–we weren’t created to fight against one another. But I think that we get confused about this because we misapply verses like Romans 12:2a:

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.

Beau asserted that our understanding of this verse, and others like it, inclines us to separate people. To draw a hard line between us and them-the “saved” and the “others”. We see the word “world” and use it to point the finger at one another, forgetting that “…our struggle is not against flesh and blood…“. We take the phrase “in the world, but not of it” and use it to isolate ourselves from other human beings created in the image of God.  2 Corinthians 4:4 tells us that, “The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.”  This verse reminds us that for a time, the god of this age (Satan) rules over the physical world. It is his way of life that permeates this age. And he wants to tempt and coerce all of us into adapting to his way. Pastor Beau told us that a better way to read Romans 12:2 would be to understand “world” defined (in this particular verse only) as “the lifestyle of the enemy”. This is what we are to resist, to be set apart from: the ways of our enemy, the tempting lifestyle he dangles in front of our desires.

I used the phrase, “in the world, but not of it” above. It’s a popular phrase, one that’s been used in church, by Christians, and is often quoted as scripture. It’s not. It is pulled from the prayer that Jesus prayed for his disciples and for all believers in John 17:

I have given them your word. And the world hates them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world. I’m not asking you to take them out of the world, but to keep them safe from the evil one. They do not belong to this world any more than I do. Make them holy by your truth; teach them your word, which is truth. Just as you sent me into the world, I am sending them into the world. And I give myself as a holy sacrifice for them so they can be made holy by your truth. “I am praying not only for these disciples but also for all who will ever believe in me through their message. I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us so that the world will believe you sent me. (John 17:14-21) 

These are the key verses from Beau’s sermon. Can you see where the “in the world but not of the world” concept came from? You can absolutely pull that thought together from these verses, but to boil this passage down into that one phrase does a massive disservice both to Jesus’s main point and to our understanding of what He was really saying.

When we read this passage and our takeaway is to isolate from “worldly” people and experiences, I believe the enemy celebrates. He celebrates every time we choose separation over connection. So I believe that part of his lying, deceiving lifestyle is attempts to keep us boxed in by our shallow understanding. He appeals to our desire to be “safe”, to be “separate”, “set apart”. If we are choosing to isolate in an effort to draw a line between us and the world, we are making a choice to be ineffective.

But Jesus, He is all about connection…

“I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us…” 

That’s a lot of connecting. And that is always His way for us. We see it all over in Scripture. And why does He want us to be one with each other and with Him and the Father?

“…so that the world will believe you sent me.”

Jesus prays that we will be one so that the world will believe. He prays,  “…I’m not asking you to take them out of the world, but to keep them safe from the evil one.” The one we’re actually fighting. His ways. Not each other. Not other people who haven’t met Jesus yet. The evil one. And then He prays, “Just as you sent me into the world, I am sending them into the world.” Jesus sends us, His followers, into the world to fight the “worldly” battle. To fight against the ways-the lifestyle-of our enemy. In order to do that though, we have to live connected. Connected to Jesus, through His Spirit living in us, connected to one another, not isolated, and connected to the the layers of ourselves, too. We are three-part beings, made up of body, soul and spirit. When these parts are disconnected from each other–when our spirit is not in control of our bodies and souls, and not submitted to the Holy Spirit within us, things get messy. The enemy’s lies and temptations get in more easily, and separation and isolation begin to look more appealing than connection. Beau said that if we want to win our spiritual battles, like Elisha, our physical and spiritual eyes have to be connected. It’s all about connection. Our enemy knows this. So he spends his energy trying to separate us. From ourselves, from God, from fellow Jesus-followers, and definitely from those who have yet to call on Jesus as Lord. 

Both Jesus and Satan are calling to us to live their way. The voice of our enemy will always call us to separate. It carries the tune of pride, and appeals to our arrogance and desire for control and safety. The voice of Jesus will always draw us to a place of connection, communion. And if our spiritual order is out of whack, we’ll resist this voice. Because connection requires humility. Dependence. Vulnerability. Risk. Brokenness. Trust… None of which we embrace naturally or willingly. That’s why I think the second half of Romans 12:2a is the part we should emphasize… Here it is again, from the NLT:

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think

Pastor Beau concluded his message with the statement “Jesus changes everything”. He told us that this is the only reason we have a fighting chance in the battle, the only reason we get to fight from victory rather than for it. Jesus does change everything. If we open up our lives to Him and invite Him to have His way in us. How do we become people who see differently, who live with our spiritual eyes connected to our physical ones? We let Him transform us into new people by inviting Him in to change the way we think. The Jesus way, this upside-down Kingdom he modeled and asks us to carry to the ends of the earth–it doesn’t make sense to our physical minds. It is understood only in the realm of the spiritual and then it can connect to, and be made manifest, in the physical. Jesus never stood at a distance from the people who needed Him most. He knew His battle wasn’t against them. He came for them. For you. For me. His enemy was and is the same enemy we fight today. The battle is not against those who haven’t yet met God-it’s against the one trying to keep them in that place. We have to get this right, friends. Our battle is not against flesh and blood. It never has been and it never will be. And every time we choose to fight against another Image-bearer, we give a little ground to our very real enemy. Jesus calls us to a different way-His way. The way of connection, communion, oneness. It’s the way the world will come to know Him. And it’s the way we walk in victory over our enemy. I choose His way-even when everything in me wants to do it my way. Will you join me?

–Laura

Highlighting some of the verses that Laura highlighted above we are reminded that:

Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Eph. 6:12

The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. 2 Cor. 4:4

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Rom. 12:2 NLT

(or with the new understanding Pastor Beau brought: Do not conform to the lifestyle of the enemy, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think.)

Jesus himself refers to Satan as the ruler of this age in John 12:31, 14:30, and 16:11. Jesus reminds us that Satan has no power over him, and that Satan already stands condemned. Satan is totally defeated–We don’t fight for victory, we fight from victory. The battle has already been won.

Pastor Beau took us back to 2 Kings chapter 6 and reminded us of Elisha’s prayer asking God to open the eyes of his servant, which God did. The servant who was only seeing with his physical eyes, could all of a sudden see behind the thin veil into the spiritual realm. When the servant saw with spiritual eyes, his mind about their battle changed dramatically–he was thinking differently. His mind was no longer blinded.

The next part of the story is fascinating. Elisha asks God to physically blind the enemy soldiers, which God does. Then Elisha leads them into a death trap. He asks God to restore their sight, which He does. The soldiers realize that things don’t look too good for them. The King of Israel asks Elisha if he should kill them. Remember–this is Old Testament, Old Covenant season–yet Elisha acts in a very New Testament way. His response?

“Do not kill them,” he answered….  Set food and water before them so that they may eat and drink and then go back to their master.”  So he prepared a great feast for them, and after they had finished eating and drinking, he sent them away, and they returned to their master. So the bands from Aram stopped raiding Israel’s territory.  (2 Kings 6:22-23)

Elisha, who was fully aware that the battle was spiritual, responded with the spiritual weapons of the Lord  that were powerful enough to bring down strongholds (2 Cor. 10 3-4). Elisha proceeded with incredible grace by providing a feast!  Not bread and water, but a feast! Then sent them on their way. The result? The bands from Aram stopped raiding Israel’s territory.

The whole story blows my mind. It is a complete foreshadowing of the ways of the New Covenant, of the Jesus who tells us to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us. (Mt. 5:44)  Of the Jesus who tells us God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. (John 3:17)

AND in John 17, the beautiful prayer of Jesus that Pastor Beau highlighted, Jesus says  As you sent me into the world, I have sent them into the world. (v. 18),

He concludes his prayer with these words:

Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me.  I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.” (vs. 25-26)

We are sent into the world with the ways of Christ. We are His physical body on earth. Thinking about Elisha’s actions, I am reminded of Romans 2:4  NLT– Don’t you see how wonderfully kind, tolerant, and patient God is with you? Does this mean nothing to you? Can’t you see that his kindness is intended to lead you to repentance?

Does wonderfully kind, tolerant, patient describe us as His people–His body? 

Laura wrote above that we are made of three parts–body, soul, spirit. Our body is literally, our physical body. Our soul includes our mind, our will, our emotions. Our spirit is the part of us that is dead (Eph 2:1) until it is brought to life in Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit who gives life (John 6:63, Romans 6:11)

If my flesh is leading the show, I’m indulging myself and way out of balance.

If my soul is leading the show, it’s not good. My mind can make up all kinds of things that aren’t factual, my will can be stubborn and self serving, and my emotions can lead me far astray. The phrase “follow your heart” is a total soul led phrase–and it’s dangerous. Jeremiah 17:11 tells us The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?  Can anybody else relate to that phrase as true?

The only way the Jesus life works is to submit our alive spirit to the Holy Spirit and let the Holy Spirit lead.  It’s the only way that people will see the kindness of the Lord in us and be led to Him.

Pastor Beau reminded us that the war we are in takes place at the point where our physical world and the spiritual world meet. We really only have two choices. We can choose to conform to the lifestyle of Christ, or the lifestyle of the enemy. There is no neutral. 

In God’s eyes, there is no human being on the face of the planet that we can call our enemy. There are spiritual rulers, authorities, spiritual forces of evil working toward our demise at all times (and the demise of all humans). They hate God and his Image-bearers. When we choose to live with an us/them mentality, we choose the lifestyle of the enemy. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be a soldier on that side of the battle. I don’t want to fight for the enemy.

Are we brave enough to ask God to show us the places that our minds have been blinded? Where our thinking is off? Are we humble enough to allow Him to show us? Are we humble enough to repent–which literally means get a new mind about what He shows us? Are we in tune enough with the Spirit to fight with the weapons of the Kingdom of heaven and fight for all people to be brought into the Kingdom of heaven? Living this way is radical. Taking a stand against the enemy for all people can be misunderstood. Sometimes it doesn’t feel comfortable–but it is always right. Can we see beyond the flesh and into the greater spiritual battle?

Jesus was not sent into the world to condemn it, but to save it. As He was sent into the world, so are we. “As” means in the same way; therefore,  we are not sent into the world to condemn it, but to love it and help people find salvation in Christ. Let’s be about plundering the enemy to populate the Kingdom of Heaven. It’s truly the only thing that matters.

I (Jesus) have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.” (Jn 17:26)

This is our commission–to make Him known.  Are you in?

–Luanne

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Contingency Plan

On Sunday in the absence of our pastor, one of our elders brought the message. Jim spoke about the importance of a contingency plan and used an illustration from his work to highlight his point. Jim is the manager of the air traffic control tower in our city, and one Friday evening he received a call, which is unusual. He was told that the tower had lost its radar, phone capabilities, computer screens– basically everything that was needed in order to carry out their duties and keep passengers and crews safe. Jim asked them if they had carried out the contingency plan, which they had. He asked if they needed anything from him. They did not. They were able to function using the contingency plan, and calling Jim was part of that plan.

I looked up the definition of “contingency plan”–  according to dictionary.com this is what one is:

1. A course of action to be followed if a preferred plan fails or an existing situation changes.
2.  A plan or procedure that will take effect if an emergency occurs; emergency plan

In Jim’s example, I can’t imagine the panic that would have set in had the air traffic control tower not had a contingency plan, but because of the plan, when the unexpected happened, they were prepared, knew what to do, and were able to continue carrying out their mission of keeping planes and people safely where they needed to be.

A contingency plan is in place before the unexpected happens. Spiritually speaking, it’s good for us to have a contingency plan. Life on this fallen planet is full of the unexpected. When the unexpected happens, do you have a plan in place?

Jim’s spiritual contingency plan consisted of four parts:

1. Keep your eyes on Jesus: Jim read to us the account of the incarcerated John the Baptist sending his followers to find out from Jesus if Jesus was truly the Messiah. John was in a crisis. He was confused. He was hurting. God wasn’t doing what he had expected, and he had some questions. (Notice that he took his questions to Jesus—always a good idea in a tough season.) Jesus didn’t get angry with John or his disciples—nor did he explain John’s situation or tell him what the outcome would be—instead, he told John’s disciples: “Go back and report to John what you hear and see: The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is proclaimed to the poor. Blessed is anyone who does not stumble on account of me.” (Matthew 11:4-6)

Jesus was reminding them of what the prophet Isaiah had foretold about the Messiah, and that even though John’s personal situation was unexpected, He, Jesus, was indeed the Messiah and His Kingdom work—God’s plan— was being done.

Ravi Zacharias says “In its essence, faith is confidence in the person of Jesus Christ and in His power, so that even when His power does not serve my end, my confidence in Him remains because of who He is.”

Does our contingency plan include choosing to hang on to Jesus, to trust Him, to have unwavering faith, even when the bottom drops out?

2. Pray for each other.  Jim illustrated this point by reading us the account of the prophet Elijah on Mount Carmel with 450 prophets of Baal (fabulous account found in 1st Kings 18).  King Ahab was a terrible king and Elijah wanted him to know the one true God  so 3 1/2 years earlier he had prayed for no rain to fall. This encounter on Mount Carmel was the tipping point in that 3 1/2 year drought coming to an end.

In the New Testament, in order to remind us of the power of prayer,  James writes this about Elijah: The earnest prayer of a righteous person has great power and produces wonderful results. Elijah was as human as we are, and yet when he prayed earnestly that no rain would fall, none fell for three and a half years! Then, when he prayed again, the sky sent down rain and the earth began to yield its crops. (James 5:16-18 NLT)

Blaise Pascal wrote one of my favorite quotes about prayer when he stated that “God instituted prayer to communicate to creatures the dignity of causality.” 

 Things happen when we pray.

And things happen when we don’t.

God told Ezekiel “I looked for someone who might rebuild the wall of righteousness that guards the land. I searched for someone to stand in the gap in the wall so I wouldn’t have to destroy the land, but I found no one.” (Ezekiel 22:30)  

Our intercession for each other and for the world is huge.

I read the following in my devotion this morning:

“Prayer (and fasting depending on the translation) is part of Jesus’ casting out of unclean spirits (Mark 9:29, Matthew 17:21). Why prayer? These verses about prayer and fasting are not about our holiness such that if we are worthy we can wield them to use God’s power…. No, prayer is conversation with God. Prayer helps us to attune our hearts toward God as well. It is in the midst of this form of communion with God that we hear from God and also make intercessions for the world around us. We pray for strength, insight, forgiveness, healing. We pray for the transformation of situations and for the needs and welfare of others. We pray for darkness to be lifted and for people to become free.  I absolutely believe in Holy Spirit driven calls to action. I also believe in the powerful activity of prayer that moves in ways that I don’t always see… If prayer is the method that Jesus uses to cast out the darkest forces that invade and misdirect our physical world, let us also choose prayer as a form of resistance to the powers and principalities of this world.”  Justin Coleman

Pray, pray, pray, pray, pray…if we want darkness conquered we must be people of prayer. Paul tells us that our battles are not against flesh and blood, he tells us to put on the armor of God, and he tells us when we have done that to PRAY.  (Eph. 6)  He tells us in 1st Thessalonians to pray without ceasing. Jesus reminds us  “The Scriptures declare, ‘My Temple will be called a house of prayer,'”  (Mt 21:13a). 

 We are the temple of God (1st Corinthians 3:16) and we are living stones being built into a spiritual house (1 Peter 5:8).  WE are His houseWould our houses, our temples be recognized as houses of prayer? Is prayer part of our plan?

3. Continue in community.  Jim used the story of Lydia in the book of Acts (chapter 16)  to highlight this part of the contingency plan. He pointed out that Paul normally went to the synagogue when he entered a new city; however, on this sabbath he went to the river to pray.  While there, he visited with a group of women, and encountered Lydia, who was a worshiper of God but did not yet have a personal relationship with Jesus. She responded to Paul’s message and was baptized. So many things about this encounter are beautiful–Paul went where the Holy Spirit led him. On this occasion the Holy Spirit led him to a group of women.  Women were little more than property to the men of that day.  But to God, each woman was His image bearer. Jesus highly esteemed women when he walked the earth, and Paul was following in the footsteps of his Savior. The result of this encounter with Lydia is that not only did she come into a relationship with Christ, she came into the kingdom of his people–community. The church in Philippi was birthed out of this encounter.

Paul was already part of the kingdom of God, and he leveraged his life to bring others in. He noticed the marginalized. This is our call. All of us. Who are the marginalized in our day, and what is Christ’s desire for them? We do not have His permission to despise anyone.  He did not come to condemn the world, but to save the world (John 3:17), and we–his people– are the ones who carry this message to those who don’t yet know Him.

One caution–when we go through hard times our tendency is to want to withdraw from community, to isolate. We are not meant to go through life alone.  Seek a community that allows you be exactly who you are, exactly where you are–one that doesn’t require pretending. Seek a community that will love you into the arms of Jesus.

Is your contingency plan to stay connected to kingdom people, and bring others in?

4. Love each other.  Jim highlighted Jesus’  words in John 13 “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”

This may be one of the trickiest parts of the contingency plan. When we are hurt, when we are disillusioned, we want to pull away from people. Jesus doesn’t give us permission to do this, instead, he gives us godly ways to handle conflict (Mt. 5:23).

Paul encourages us to speak the truth in love. (Eph 5:14)   James reminds us that we all stumble in many ways. (James 3:2)  Peter tells us “You were cleansed from your sins when you obeyed the truth, so now you must show sincere love to each other as brothers and sisters. Love each other deeply with all your heart.” (1st Peter 1:22).

Does your plan include choosing to love?

Jim’s air traffic controllers had a contingency plan in place. When the bottom fell out and their normal system failed they followed the contingency plan.

My hope is that each piece of our spiritual contingency plan is part of our daily lives–focusing on Jesus, prayer, healthy spiritual community, and loving well–so that it is as natural to us as breathing. Then, when life falls apart, systems fail, and the bottom drops out-we hold on to Jesus, to His people and weather the storm with eyes fixed on Him.

–Luanne

As I think back over the four parts of the contingency plan that Jim laid out for us, I believe that the first and the last are paramount for us to really grab hold of. Keep our eyes on Jesus and love each other. When I put these two side by side, it reminds me of some words that Jesus spoke when He was asked which commandment is the most important. He answered:

“…You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.” (Mark 12:30-31 NLT)

During Jesus’ ministry, He never wavered about what had to come first. He called out sin, of course, and He spoke and taught about many things. But He maintained that our primary focus as His followers was to 1. Love God, and 2. Love (all) people. This is what we’re called to. It’s always been the way to bring His Kingdom on earth. I know that Jim’s first point was to keep our eyes on Jesus, not to love Him–but I think they are one and the same. If we fix our eyes on Him, if we see Him for who He really is, we will love Him.

So the two most important commandments, according to Jesus, are the bookends to Jim’s contingency plan. I’m going to focus only on these two points here, because I believe that loving God and loving each other are what spur us on to pray for each other and to continue in community. They are part of the natural outflow of prioritizing the other two, and cannot exist without them.

Okay… Love God. Love people. 

So simple… and so hard.

One of the reasons this simple command is so hard has to do with something Jim brought up on Sunday. He used the term “expectation bias“, and I believe it can get in the way of fulfilling the call we were given (Sidenote: It is a call and it applies to all of us…) to love both God and people.

So, what is it? What is expectation bias?

Expectation is defined as: A strong belief that something will happen or be the case in the future; an attitude of expectancy or hope. 

Bias is: A particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned. 

Expectation bias is explained a lot of different ways by a lot of people who are much smarter than me. One article I read defined it this way:

Having a strong belief or mindset towards a particular outcome that influences perceptions of one’s own, or others’, behavior.

If we look at the three different definitions above, it’s easy to see that expectation bias can be a slippery slope. None of it is grounded in truth. Our expectations may be grounded in truth at first; they may spring up from the hope that we have, hope that comes from our knowledge of God and His love for us as well as from Scripture. But it doesn’t take much for our expectations to move away from truth and toward a focus on self. And when expectation is paired with bias, which is often preconceived or unreasoned, based on incomplete stories or isolated experiences, it’s a dangerous combination.

So let’s look at Jim’s first point: Keep your eyes on Jesus. How could expectation bias complicate this simple concept? In the story Jim referenced about John the Baptist, John asked this question of Jesus:

 “Are you the Messiah we’ve been expecting, or should we keep looking for someone else?” (Matthew 11:3 NLT)

John (and many others over the course of Jesus’ ministry) suffered from expectation bias. They expected a conquering King, not a suffering Savior. Nothing Jesus did or said lined up with their expectations of Him, even though-as Luanne wrote about above-He was fulfilling every prophecy that had been written about the coming Messiah. John’s expectations began with the prophecies from Scripture that he had learned about since childhood. His expectations started out grounded in truth. But as he grew, bits of his own ideas, his own bias, infiltrated what began as pure, hopeful expectation, and as the story unfolded and he found himself in very unfavorable circumstances, his expectation bias kept him from seeing Jesus. He had, at some point, lost sight of the real Jesus, the prophecy-fulfilling Jesus he’d grown up with, and he’d fixed his eyes on a counterfeit. He had fixed his eyes on a self-serving image of the Messiah somewhere along the journey. And we are in constant danger of doing the same thing. 

If we are going to fulfill the first and greatest commandment, we have to have our eyes fixed on the real Jesus-not the self-made version that suits us best. We can’t say we love Him if we’re not looking at the real thing. The real Jesus is found in Scripture. The real Jesus can be seen in the faces around us. The real Jesus is revealed to us in everyday moments through the power and presence of the Holy Spirit. The real Jesus won’t always keep us from or get us out of crises–but He is always by our side in the midst of our suffering. We have to fix our eyes on that Jesus. If we can do that, if we can look up into the face of love Himself-all filters and expectations aside-we will love Him with all of ourselves. We just will.

When it comes to Jim’s last point, Love each other, we see expectation bias affect things a little differently. Luanne wrote this above:

“Jim highlighted Jesus’  words in John 13 “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” This may be one of the trickiest parts of the contingency plan. When we are hurt, when we are disillusioned, we want to pull away from people. Jesus doesn’t give us permission to do this…”

When it comes to people, our expectations can reach all-out crazy levels. And we have so many different biases, we are probably unaware of most them. All of our expectations, in regard to other people, are rooted in selfishness. 

Um… all of them? I think so. Yes. I am sitting here trying to think of one single expectation I have of another human being that isn’t somehow linked back to me and my well-being… and I can’t find one. If you disagree, feel free to comment–I would love to be wrong about this!! But I don’t think I am. I could write example after example and dig into the roots of all of them, but I won’t do that here. I would challenge you to think about it though, and to pray through what God might be saying to you on the subject.

I’ve been studying the life of Joseph the last few weeks. Not Mary’s Joseph. The Joseph who was daddy’s favorite-the one with the beautiful coat of many colors… the dreamer. That Joseph. He went through some stuff. We could definitely say that he experienced a crisis or two… His circumstances were beyond unfavorable from the time his brothers sold him into slavery until the dream God had given him was realized in his life a couple of decades later. He was betrayed by those closest to him. He was sold into slavery. Falsely accused. Imprisoned. Forgotten. Alone. And yet… We never see expectation bias play out in the way Joseph interacted with those around him. And years later, when his brothers repented of their sin against him, Joseph’s response was:

You intended to harm me, but God intended it all for good. He brought me to this position so I could save the lives of many people. No, don’t be afraid. I will continue to take care of you and your children.” So he reassured them by speaking kindly to them. (Genesis 50:20-21 NLT)

When we’ve been hurt, mistreated, let down-and we all have-our expectation bias will grow out of control if we let it. If we don’t keep our eyes on Jesus, attach our hearts to His word, His truth, our minds and hearts will run wild with fear, conspiracies, stories we’ve created out of our pain. Joseph could have found himself in the midst of a bitter, resentful web of expectation bias. But he didn’t. I think it might be because he had a contingency plan. He knew His God and he kept his eyes, his heart, his mind, his strength firmly fixed on Him. And because He did this, because He loved God most, he also loved others. And he made accommodation for their shortcomings. He chose to love anyway, to move toward people anyway, to draw those who had betrayed him back to himself anyway… I see such a picture of Jesus in Joseph’s story. It’s what Jesus does for us. It’s what he asks us to do for others. Ann Voskamp writes this in her book Be the Gift,

I am what I love and I will love you like Jesus, because of Jesus, through the strength of Jesus. I will love when I’m not loved back. I will love when I’m hurt and disappointed and betrayed and inconvenienced and rejected. I simply will love, no expectations, no conditions, no demands. Love is not always agreement with someone, but it is always sacrifice for someone.

Loving each other means laying aside our expectation bias and moving toward people anyway. We can only love each other if we fix our eyes on the Jesus who loves us perfectly first. And if we fix our eyes on Him and love others, we will pray for each other and we will continue in community.

Contingency plans exist for the crisis. They’re in place for when the unexpected happens. When we find ourselves in crisis, we have to hang onto, “…but God intended it all for good…” He knows what we’re going through. He has a plan. Do we?

–Laura

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